104 Marlborough

104 Marlborough (2015)

Lot 19' x 112' (2,128 sf)

Lot 19′ x 112′ (2,128 sf)

104 Marlborough is located on the south side of Marlborough, between Clarendon and Dartmouth, with 270 Clarendon to the east and 106 Marlborough to the west.

104 Marlborough was built ca. 1866 as the home of hardware merchant Albert Fleetford Sise and his wife, Edith (Ware) Sise.  They previously had lived at 26 Chauncy.  They continued to live at 104 Marlborough in 1870, but had moved to Medford by 1872.

By 1874, 104 Marlborough was the home (and probably the medical office) of Dr. David Hyslop Hayden, a physician.  In 1873, he had lived and maintained his medical offices at 60 Chambers.  John Hayden is shown as the owner of 104 Marlborough on the 1874 Hopkins map (the house probably was owned by the estate of John Hayden, David Hayden’s father, who had died in 1869).

By 1874, David Hayden was joined at 104 Marlborough by his brother and sister-in-law,  Horace John Hayden and Harriet (Putnam) Hayden.  Horace Hayden was general freight agent for the Boston and Albany Rail Road.  They had married in October of 1872 and probably had lived briefly thereafter in Kansas City, Missouri, where he had been general freight and ticket agent for the Missouri River, Fort Scott and Gulf Railroad.

David Hayden married in September of 1876 to Elizabeth Cabot Blake.  Soon thereafter, they moved to 285 Clarendon, which had been Elizabeth Blake’s family home (her mother, Ann Hull (Blake) Blake, had died in 1873 and her father, George Baty Blake, had died in 1875).

Horace and Harriet Hayden continued to live at 104 Marlborough in 1880 but moved soon thereafter, probably to New York City (he joined the New York Central Rail Road in 1880).  He is shown, however, as the owner of 104 Marlborough on the 1883 Bromley map.

By the 1880-1881 winter season, 104 Marlborough was the home of carpet dealer Arthur B. Lovejoy and his wife, Grace (Cheever) Lovejoy.  They previously had lived in Salem.  They continued to live at 104 Marlborough during the 1882-1883 season, but moved soon thereafter.

In the Fall of 1883, the house was purchased by Robert Grant and his wife, Amy Gordon (Galt) Grant.  They also maintained a home in Nahant.

Robert Grant was a lawyer and would later become a probate court judge,  He also was a well known and prolific author of novels.

Robert and Amy Grant had been married in July of 1883.  Prior to their marriage, Robert Grant had lived with his father, Patrick Grant, at 14 Commonwealth.  His father’s commission merchant business had failed in 1883.  He sold his house at 14 Commonwealth and moved to 104 Marlborough to live with his son and daughter-in-law.

106-106 Marlborough (2015)

106-106 Marlborough (2015)

In his autobiography, Fourscore, Robert Grant indicates that he and his wife purchased 104 Marlborough.  However, it is shown as owned by Patrick Grant, Trustee, on the 1888 and 1898 Bromley maps, and it appears likely that the proceeds of Patrick Grant’s sale of 14 Commonwealth were used to purchase 104 Marlborough.

Robert Grant describes 104 Marlborough as “a snug little house, which looked as if it would accommodate comfortably fewer than it did.”  He notes, “My father, the one chiefly to be considered, had a large room to himself on the second floor; we sheltered four maids and employed a chore man.  Our range of expenses for the first four years was from $6500 to $7500, without life insurance, and we paid our bills invariably by the tenth of every month.”  He also notes that his father shared the expenses.

Patrick Grant died in October of 1895.  Robert and Amy Grant continued to live at 104 Marlborough until the Fall of 1898, when they moved to a new home they had built at 211 Bay State Road.  William MInot, trustee, is shown as the owner of 104 Marlborough on the 1898 Bromley map.

104 Marlborough was not listed in the 1899 and 1900 Blue Books.

By 1900, it was the home of Francis Bacon Sears and his wife Mary Elizabeth (Sparhawk) Sears.  They had lived in an apartment at 220 Marlborough in 1899.  They also maintained a home on the Old Boston Road in Weston until 1906, when it was destroyed by fire.

Francis Bacon Sears was a banker and also served as treasurer of several cotton mills in Georgia and South Carolina.

The Searses continued to live at 104 Marlborough in 1906, but had moved to 284 Marlborough by 1907.

104 Marlborough was not listed in the 1907 Blue Book.

By 1908, 104 Marlborough was owned by  Dr. James Jackson Putnam, a neurologist, and his wife, Marion (Cabot) Putnam.  They lived next door at 106 Marlborough.  He is shown as the owner of both houses on the 1908 and 1917 Bromley maps.

104 Marlborough became the home of Dr. Putnam’s sister, Elizabeth Cabot Putnam, who previously had lived at 63 Marlborough with her other brother, Dr. Charles Pickering Putnam.  It also was the home and medical office, first of Dr. H. M. Swift (in 1907) and then Dr. Walter E. Paul (from 1909 through 1923).  Several shorter-term lodgers also lived at 104 Marlborough with Miss Putnam and Dr. Paul.

James Putnam died in November of 1918.  After his death, 104 and 106 Marlborough were transferred to a trust, with Marion Putnam’s brother, Frederick P. Cabot. and brother-in-law, Arthur Lyman (husband of Susan Channing Cabot) as trustees.

Marion Putnam continued to live at 106 Marlborough.  At the time of the 1920 US Census, 104-106 Marlborough were listed together, and Marion Putnam was listed as keeper of a lodging house.  Elizabeth Putnam was listed as a member of the family, and Dr. Paul and Miss Elizabeth Perkins Hamlen were shown as lodgers.

Elizabeth Cabot Putnam continued to live at 104 Marlborough until her death in October of 1922.  Dr. Paul continued to live there in 1923, along with Miss Hamlen, but neither were listed there in the 1924 Blue Book.

104 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

104 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

In mid-1923, 104 Marlborough was purchased by attorney Charles Henry Fiske, Je., and his wife, Mary Duncan (Thorndike) Fiske.  The sale was reported by the Boston Globe on June 14, 1923.  They previously had lived in an apartment at The Colonial at 382 Commonwealth.  He is shown as the owner of 104 Marlborough on the 1928 Bromley map

The Fiskes lived at 104 Marlborough during the 1923-1924 winter season.  Their daughter, Cornelia Robbins Fiske, lived with them until her marriage in April of 1924 to Thomas Wentworth Storrow, a stockbroker; after their marriage, they lived in Readville.

By the 1924-1925 winter season, the Fiskes were living in Weston and 104 Marlborough was the home of the Misses Katherine Lyman Thomas, Alice Lee Whitridge Thomas, Rosamond Whitridge Thomas, and Elizabeth (Betty) Thomas.  They were the daughters of architect Douglas Hamilton Thomas and his wife, Bessie Lyman (Chadwick) Thomas.  They previously had lived at 288 Beacon. They continued to live at 104 Marlborough during the 1926-1927 winter season, but moved to 5 Brimmer soon thereafter.

By late 1927, the Fiskes were living at 104 Marlborough once again, but were shown as “abroad for the winter” in the 1928 Blue Book, and Arthur Wellington Bell and his wife, Marion Hiller (Fenno) Bell, lived there for 1927-1928 winter season.  They previously had lived at 450 Beacon with her parents, Edward Nicoll Fenno and Ellen Marion (Bradlee) Fenno.  He was a retired investment banker from Pittsburgh and later would become an author.  They also maintained a home in Falmouth.  By the 1929-1930 winter season, they were living at 72 Beacon.

The Fiskes lived at 104 Marlborough during the 1928-1929 winter season, but by 1930 had made their home in Weston their year-round residence.  They continued to own 104 Marlborough and lease it to others.

During the 1929-1930 winter season, 104 Marlborough was the home of Mrs. Margaret Mallay (shown as Mrs. Margaret Malley in the City Directory).

By 1931, 104 Marlborough was the home of Admiral William Sowden Sims and his wife, Anne (Hitchcock) Sims.  They had lived at 26 Brimmer in 1930 and at 194 Beacon in 1929.

Admiral Sims was former President of the Naval War College.  During World War I, he was in command of all US naval forces operating in Europe.  His account of the naval effort during the war, The Victory at Sea, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1921.

They continued to live there during the winter seasons through 1935, but had had moved to an apartment at 6 Arlington by 1936.  He died in September of 1936.

In mid-1935, Gilbert Russell Payson, et al, purchased 104 Marlborough from Charles Fiske.  The sale was reported by the Boston Globe on June 16, 1935.

104 Marlborough was not listed in the 1936 and 1937 Blue Books, nor in the 1935-1937 Lists of Residents.

G. R. Payson, et al, are shown as the owners of 104 Marlborough on the 1938 Bromley map.

By 1939, 104 Marlborough was the home of Howard A. Cronk (born Howard Crawford Cronk), a commercial artist, and his wife, Alice Ruth (McKechnie) Hutchins Cronk.  They operated it as a lodging house.  They previously had lived at 151 Park Drive.  They continued to live at 104 Marlborough in 1943.

By 1941, 104 Marlborough was owned by George C. Abernathy, Jr.

In early 1941, 104 Marlborough was purchased from George Abernathy by Louis Dennett.  The sale was reported by the Boston Globe on February 23, 1941.    Louis Burton Dennett was a dentist; he owned 106 Marlborough, where he had maintained his offices since about 1933.  He and his wife, Inez Adelaide (Heilbrun) Dennett, made 104 Marlborough their home; they previously had lived in Wellesley Hills.

The Dennetts continued to live at 104 Marlborough in 1949.  By 1950, they had moved to 106 Marlborough, where he continued to maintain his office, and 104 Marlborough had become the home of Inez Dennett’s sister, Mrs. Grace Margaret (Heilbrun) Nolan, the widow of Edmund Patrick Nolan, and their son, Robert L. Nolan, a student.  They previously had lived in New Hampshire.

In about 1955, the Dennetts moved back to 104 Marlborough to live with Grace Nolan and her son.  Robert Nolan married in June of 1955 to Jean M. MacDonald.  After their marriage, they lived at 104 Marlborough with his mother and the Dennetts.

The Dennetts and the Nolans continued to live at 104 Marlborough until about 1958.

In July of 1958, Bernard Samuel Schwartz and his wife, Bessie G. (Levine) Schwartz, purchased 104 Marlborough from the Dennetts (Dr. Dennett retired at about this time, and he and his wife moved to Lakeville).  Bernard Schwartz also was a dentist and he made 104 Marlborough his office.  He and his wife lived in Brighton.

By 1963, he had subdivided 104 Marlborough into two apartments, and by 1967 he had increased the number to three.  No record of the change of occupancy appears to be included in the Building Department files.

Bernard Schwartz died in June of 1973, and in March of 1980, Durine Alinova (Dieters) Munson, wife of architect Thurston Wells Munson, acquired 104 Marlborough from Bessie Schwartz, his widow.  Durine Alinova was a principal with the Boston Ballet.

In July of 1980, she converted the property into two condominiums.  In July of 1983, the number of units was increased to three.