122 Marlborough

122 Marlborough (2015)

Lot 17.67' x 112' (1,979 sf)

Lot 17.67′ x 112′ (1,979 sf)

122 Marlborough is located on the south side of Marlborough, between Clarendon and Dartmouth, with 120 Marlborough to the east and 124 Marlborough to the west.

122 Marlborough was built ca. 1868 for merchant, cotton manufacturer, and real estate developer Charles W. Freeland, probably for speculative sale, one of 11 contiguous houses (110-130 Marlborough).  The houses are arranged in a symmetrical composition, with two houses at each end of the group (110-112 Marlborough and 128-130 Marlborough) with bay windows which carry into the mansard roof, two pairs of intermediate houses with oriel windows (114-116 Marlborough and 124-126 Marlborough), and a central pavilion of three houses (118-120-122 Marlborough).

By 1870, 122 Marlborough was the home of lace and embroidery dealer Andrew Carrico Mudge and his wife, Cornelia Adelaide (Hawkes) Mudge.  In 1869, they had lived in Brookline.  They continued to live at 122 Marlborough in 1872.  By 1873, they had moved to the Parker House.  However, he continued to be shown as the owner on the 1874 Hopkins map.

By 1873, 122 Marlborough was the home of John Mason Little and his wife Helen (Beal) Little. They had been married in January of 1872.  Before their marriage, he had lived with at 2 Commonwealth with his parents, James Lovell Little and Julia Augusta (Cook) Little.  His father is shown as the owner of 122 Marlborough on the 1883 and 1888 Bromley maps.  James L. Little died in June of 1889, and James L. Little, Jr., et al, trustees, are shown as the owners on the 1895 and 1898 maps.

120-122 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

120-122 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

John Mason Little was a wholesale dry goods merchant in his father’s firm.  After his father’s death, he served as trustee for the family estate (held in the Pelham Trust) and, in 1917, constructed the Little Building at the corner of Boylston and Tremont, a 12-story office building on the site of the Hotel Pelham.

John and Helen Little continued to live at 122 Marlborough until about 1879, but by 1880 had moved to 317 Dartmouth.

In 1880, 122 Marlborough was the home of East India shipping merchant Stanton Whitney and his wife, Alice Rebecca (Sutton) Whitney.  In 1879, they had lived at 6 Newbury.  They also maintained a home in Beverly.  He died in September of 1880,  Alice Whitney continued to live at 122 Marlborough during the 1881-1882 winter season, but moved soon thereafter.

By the 1882-1883 winter season, it was the home of Edward Wheaton and his wife, Charlotte Rhodes (Knight) Wheaton.  They previously had lived at the Parker House.  He was a railroad contractor.  They continued to live at 122 Marlborough during the 1883-1884 season, but moved soon thereafter.

By the 1884-1885 winter season, 122 Marlborough was the home and medical office of Dr. George Horton Tilden, a physician specializing in dermatology.  In 1884, he had lived at 127 Boylston.

During the 1887-1888 winter season, William Hooper, treasurer of the Atlantic Cotton Mills, also was living at 122 Marlborough.  He was a widower and probably previously had lived in Lawrence, where his wife, Louise (Stoughton) Hooper, had died in February of 1886.  By the 1888,1889 season, he had moved to 276 Beacon to live with his mother, Adeline Denny (Ropley) Hooper, the widow of Robert Chamblet Hooper.

By the 1888-1889 winter season, Dr. Tilden had been joined at 122 Marlborough by Charles Wilkins Sturgis and Francis Shaw Sturgis, brothers.   Charles Sturgis was a clerk at the US Subtreasury, and Francis Shaw Sturgis was an artist.  They previously had lived at 70 St. James.

George Tilden and Charles and Francis Sturgis continued to live at 122 Marlborough during the 1890-1891 winter season.  George Tilden then went to Japan, where he lived for several years; The Sturgis brothers moved to 373 Boylston.

118-122 Marlborough (2015)

By the 1891-1892 winter season, 122 Marlborough was the home of Dr. Samuel Breck, a physician, and his wife, Louisa Maria (Eddy) Breck. They previously had lived at 150 Commonwealth.  He also maintained his medical offices at 122 Marlborough, as he had previously at 150 Commonwealth.

The Brecks continued to live at 122 Marlborough in 1893.  By 1894, they had moved to 171 Bellevue in Roxbury and he had moved his offices to 172 Commonwealth.

By the 1893-1894 winter season, 122 Marlborough was the home and medical office of Dr. Fred Bates Lund, a physician and surgeon, and his wife, Zoe Meriam (Griffing) Lund.  They had married in May of 1893 and 122 Marlborough probably was their first home together.  They also maintained a home in Scituate.  They continued to live at 122 Marlborough until 1899, when they moved to 529 Beacon.

122 Marlborough was not listed in the 1900 and 1901 Blue Books, and appears to have been omitted from the 1900 US Census.

By 1902, it was the home of Josiah French Hill and his wife, Blanche Theodora (Ford) Hill.

Josiah Hill formerly was Secretary of the Southern Railroad in New York City.  In 1900, they moved to Boston and he joined the investment banking firm of Lee, Higginson and Company, first as a statistician and later as manager.

By 1903, they had moved to 194 Marlborough.

By the 1902-1903 winter season, 122 Marlborough was the home of stockbroker Chester L. Dane and his wife, Grace (Oliver) Dane.  They had married in April of 1902 and 122 Marlborough probably was their first home together.  They continued to live there in 1905, but had moved to 322 Beacon by 1906.

By 1906, 122 Marlborough was the home of Edward Carrington Bates, a mechanical engineer and inventor, and his wife, Edna (Ellis) Learned Bates.  Edna Bates is shown as the owner on the 1908 and 1917 Bromley maps.

Edward Bates died in July of 1918.  Edna Bates continued to live at 122 Marlborough and in August of 1919 married again, to Armistead Keith Baylor, and electrical engineer and executive with General Electric.  After their marriage, they moved to New York City.

By the 1920-1921 winter season, 122 Marlborough was the home of Dr. Louis Guy Mead, a physician, and his wife, Mary Isabella (Temple) Priest Mead.  They had lived in an apartment at 259 Beacon in 1920.  Mary Mead is shown as the owner on the 1928 Bromley map.

Living with them were Mary Mead’s children by her first marriage, to Sidney Priest: Emily and George Temple Priest.

Emily Priest married in June of 1928 to Dr. Charles Fremont McKhann, Jr., a physician and professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.  They moved to Brookline.

Louis Mead died in June of 1930, and Mary Mead died in December of 1931.

In April of 1932, George Priest, a salesman, married Alice Sykes.  They made 122 Marlborough their home during the 1932-1933 winter season and then moved to Framingham.

Emily (Priest) McKhann had died in 1932, and in September of 1933, Charles McKhann married again, to Dr. Helen Semenenko, also a physician.  They lived at 122 Marlborough during the 1934-1935 winter season, but moved soon thereafter to Milton.  Dr. McKhann maintained his office at Children’s Hospital, and Dr. Semenenko maintained her office at 122 Marlborough.

By late 1935, 122 Marlborough was owned by Suffolk Savings Bank.  In December of 1935, it applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into five apartments.

122 Marlborough was not listed in the 1936 Blue Book and was shown as vacant in the 1936 City Directory.  The bank continued to be shown as the owner on the 1938 Bromley map.

The property changed hands and by in July of 1991 was purchased by Mary H. Myers.  In October of 1991, she filed for (and subsequently received) permission to remodel the house and change its occupancy from five apartments back to a single-family dwelling.

It remained a single-family dwelling in 2015.

114-126 Marlborough (2013)

114-126 Marlborough (2013)