134 Marlborough

134 Marlborough (2015)

Lot 24' x 112' (2,688 sf)

Lot 24′ x 112′ (2,688 sf)

134 Marlborough is located on the south side of Marlborough, between Clarendon and Dartmouth, with 132 Marlborough to the east and 136 Marlborough to the west.

134 Marlborough was built ca. 1872 for building contractor John Farrington, probably for speculative sale.  It was one of three contiguous houses (132-134-136 Marlborough). John Farrington also had five more contiguous houses built ca. 1872 at 140-142-144-146-148 Marlborough, leaving a vacant lot at 138 Marlborough.

By 1873, 134 Marlborough was the home of boot, shoe, and leather dealer Joshua Brooks Kimball and his wife, Nancy (Grout) Kimball.  They previously had lived at 13 Mt. Vernon.  He is shown as the owner of 134 Marlborough on the 1874 Hopkins map.

At the time of the 1880 US Census they were living elsewhere and 134 Marlborough was the home of Sidney Frederick Tyler and his wife, Mary Woodrow (Binney) Tyler. He was Massachusetts General Agent for the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. They had been married in February of 1880, and 134 Marlborough probably was their first home together.  In 1879, he had lived in Providence.

By the 1880-1881 winter season, the Tylers had moved to 120 Marlborough and 134 Marlborough was once again the home of Joshua and Nancy Kimball.  Soon thereafter, they moved to 83 Worcester to live with their son and daughter-in-law, George Henry and Sylvia (Pitcher) Kimball.  George Kimball was a partner in his father’s shoe, boot, and leather firm.  Joshua and Nancy Kimball continued to live there until their deaths (he in September of 1885 and she in February of 1892).  Nancy Kimball continued to be shown as the owner of 134 Marlborough on the 1883 and 1888 Bromley maps; George Henry Kimball is shown as the owner on the 1895 and 1898 maps.

During the 1881-1882 winter season, 134 Marlborough was the home of shoe manufacturer Albert Leighton Coolidge and his wife, Elizabeth (Wiggin) Coolidge.   They had lived at the Hotel Vendôme during the previous season.  By the 1882-1883 season, they had moved to the Hotel Agassiz at 191 Commonwealth.

134 Marlborough was not listed in the 1883 Blue Book.

By 1884, 134 Marlborough was the home of dry goods merchant Alexander Henderson and his wife, Mary A. (O’Connor) Henderson.  They continued to live there during the 1884-1885 winter season, but moved soon thereafter to the Hotel Kensington at 687 Boylston.

By the 1885-1886 winter season, 134 Marlborough was the home of dry goods commission merchant Eugene Battelle and his wife, Susan Parkman (Munro) Battelle.  They had lived at 321 Dartmouth during the previous season.  By mid-1886, they had moved to 317 Dartmouth.

By the 1886-1887 winter season, 134 Marlborough was the home of Eugene Henry Sampson and his wife, Martha (Gilbert) Sampson.  They previously had lived at 16 Newbury and, before that, at 36 Commonwealth.  He was treasurer of Everett Mills, textile manufacturers.

By the 1887-1888 winter season, Mrs. Helen (Ayer) Winslow, the widow of Dr. Edward Hubbard Winslow, a physician, also was living at 134 Marlborough.  Their son, Edward Winslow, lived with her.  They previously had lived at 157 Boylston.

134-138 Marlborough (2015)

134-138 Marlborough (2015)

A third family also was living at 134 Marlborough during the 1887-1888 season: Daniel Lothrop, a book publisher specializing in children’s books, and his wife, Harriet Mulford (Stone) Lothrop, who was the author of children’s books (notably the “Five Little Peppers” series) writing under the name Margaret Sidney.  Their primary residence was their home, Wayside, in Concord, which had been the home of Nathaniel Hawthorne.  The Lothrops probably were living in Boston for the winter while he reorganized his publishing firm into a corporation.

By the 1888-1889 winter season, the Lothrops had moved and were living at their home in Concord.  The Sampsons and Mrs. Winslow and her son were joined at 134 Marlborough by commission merchant Charles E. Maxwell and his wife, Velma Elizabeth (Clapp) Maxwell.  They previously had lived at 62 Bowdoin.

By the 1889-1890 winter season, Sampsons had moved to New York City, where Eugene Sampson was in charge of the New York office of O. H. Sampson & Company, a wholesale dry goods firm organized by his brother, Oscar Hallet Sampson.  The Maxwells also had moved, to 16 Mt. Vernon.

Helen Winslow and Edward Winslow continued to live at 134 Marlborough during the 1890-1891 winter season, but moved soon thereafter to Chestnut Hill.

By the 1891-1892 winter season, 134 Marlborough was the home of Miss Helen L. McLellan.

By 1896, she had been joined by Dr. James Marsh Jackson, a physician, and his wife, Leonora (Lewis) Jackson.  They had married in May of 1895 and 134 Marlborough probably was their first home together.  Prior to their marriage, he had been a lodger at 197 Beacon, where he continued to maintain his office.  By the 1897-1898 winter season, they had moved to an apartment at The Grosvenor at 259 Beacon.

Helen McLellan continued to live at 134 Marlborough until late 1899, when she traveled abroad.

134 Marlborough was not listed in the 1900 Blue Book.

On January 4, 1900, the Boston Globe reported that 134 Marlborough had been purchased from George Kimball by Charles L. Flint.  The article indicates that he purchased the property “for a residence” but it appears that he never lived there.

In mid-1900, it was purchased from Charles Flint by cotton merchant Isaac Rand Thomas and his wife, Gertrude Stewart (Fabyan) Thomas.  The sale was reported by the Boston Globe on July 6, 1900.  They previously had lived in Brookline.  They continued to live at 134 Marlborough until 1907 when they purchased and moved to 303 Commonwealth.

By the 1907-1908 winter season, 134 Marlborough was the home of Edward Bancroft Bayley and his wife, Mary Richards (Clark) Bayley.  They previously had lived at 42 Gloucester.  Mary R. Bayley is shown as the owner of 134 Marlborough on the 1908, 1917, 1928, and 1938 Bromley maps.  They also maintained a summer home in Cohasset.

Edward Bayley was affiliated with the shipping firm of Henry W. Peabody & Company, a partner in the Boston Office, which dealt primarily in hemp, sisal, and other fibers.

Edward Bayley died in July of 1936.  Mary Bayley continued to live at 134 Marlborough until her death in 1956.

In mid-1957, 134 Marlborough was purchased by Eli (Elie) A. Richard, a barber, and his wife, Jeanne M. (Ducharme) Richard, a musician and music teacher.  They previously had lived at 134 St. Botolph.  In August of 1957, they applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into a single-family dwelling and lodging house.  They continued to live at 134 Marlborough and operate it as a lodging house until 1972.

In January of 1973, real estate broker and investor George P. Demeter purchased 134 Marlborough from Eli and Jeanne Richard.  He continued to operate it as a lodging house, but in the late 1970s apparently converted it into apartments.  In February of 1996, the property was purchased by the Yia Yia Realty LP, and in January of 1997, it applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property into nine apartments, noting that the “building has been occupied as apartments at least since 1978.”

134 Marlborough remained an apartment building in 2010.