476 Beacon

476 Beacon (2015)

Lot 26' x 150' (3,900 sf)

Lot 26′ x 150′ (3,900 sf)

476 Beacon is located on the north side of Beacon, between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue, with 474 Beacon to the east and 478 Beacon to the west.

476 Beacon was designed by Fehmer and Page, architects, and built in 1891-1892 by Thomas J. Lyons, mason, as the home of retired merchant Edward Frothingham and his wife, Eugenia (Mifflin) Frothingham. He is shown as the owner on the original building permit application, dated November 2, 1891, and on the final building inspection report, dated December 3, 1892.

Eugenia Frothingham purchased the land for 476 Beacon on October 16, 1891, from building contractor George Wheatland, Jr., who had purchased it on that same day from the Boston and Roxbury Mill Corporation.

The deeds from the Boston and Roxbury Mill Corporation for the land between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue included language specifying that only dwellings and associated outbuildings (including stables) could be built on the land and that the buildings were to be set back 20 feet from Beacon. The deeds for the land between 460 Beacon and Massachusetts Avenue were entered into in the early 1890s and also included restrictions limiting to one story any building in the rear north of a line 90 feet from Beacon. The deeds for the land between Hereford and 458 Beacon, which were from 1886, did not include language limiting buildings in the rear. As a result, the owners of the land at 448-458 Beacon entered into individual agreements to limit the depth of the houses that were built on their land and restrict the height of outbuildings in the rear to one story. On August 2, 1909, all of the owners of the property on the north side of Beacon between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue (other than the Mt. Vernon Church) entered into an agreement to “continue for twenty years longer [to December 31, 1929] the existing freedom from irregular building and obstruction of view which they now enjoy from the rear portion of their houses.” On December 30, 1929, the owners of 448-480 Beacon extended this agreement to expire on December 31, 1939.

Click here for an index to the deeds for 476 Beacon, including additional information on the deeds and agreements limiting buildings in the rear of the lot.

Basement, first, and second floor plans of 476 Beacon, bound with the final building inspection report , 3Dec1892 (v. 49, p. 8); courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department

Basement, first, and second floor plans of 476 Beacon, bound with the final building inspection report , 3Dec1892 (v. 49, p. 8); courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department

By the 1893-1894 winter season, Edward Frothingham and Eugenia (Mifflin) Frothingham had made 476 Beacon their home. Their three children — Eugenia Brooks Frothingham, Olga Frothingham, and Charles Mifflin Frothingham — lived with them. They all previously had lived at 210 Beacon with his nephew, Gorham Hubbard, and his wife, Sarah (Henshaw) Hubbard.

Olga Frothingham married in December of 1901 to her first cousin, Dr. Langdon Frothingham, a veterinarian. Prior to their marriage, he had lived at 20 Hereford with his brother, Louis Adams Frothingham, an attorney and future Lt. Governor of Massachusetts, and their sister, Anne Gorham Frothingham.  After their marriage, Langdon and Olga Frothingham moved to The Charlesgate at 535 Beacon.

Edward Frothingham died in December of 1906. Eugenia Frothingham and her unmarried children, Eugenia and Charles, continued to live at 476 Beacon.

Charles Frothingham moved to the Hemenway Chambers at 91 Westland Avenue in about 1909. He was president of the Trojan Cracker Company. He married in August of 1913 to Lillian F. Sault. They subsequently moved to Wayland where he owned and operated a farm.

On April 2, 1914, Eugenia (Mifflin) Frothingham transferred 476 Beacon to Eugenia Brooks Frothingham. She was an author and active suffragette.

Eugenia (Mifflin) Frothingham died in August of 1919, and by the 1919-1920 winter season, Eugenia Brooks Frothingham had been joined at 476 Beacon by Langdon and Olga Frothingham. They previously had lived at 336 Bay State Road.

Eugenia Brooks Frothingham continued to live at 476 Beacon during the 1921-1922 winter season, but moved thereafter to 353 Beacon.

On October 10, 1922, 474 Beacon was acquired from Eugenia Brooks Frothingham by her brother, Charles, and sister, Olga, and on April 9, 1923, Olga Frothingam acquired her brother’s one-half interest in the property.

Langdon and Olga Frothingham continued to live at 476 Beacon. They also maintained a home in Pocasset.

476 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

476 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

Langdon Frothingham died in July of 1935. Olga Frothingham continued to live at 476 Beacon until about 1937, when she moved once again to The Charlesgate at 535 Beacon.

On May 5, 1937, 476 Beacon was purchased from Olga Frothingham by James Michael Dunbar, Jr., a plumber. He and his wife, Helen R. (O’Brien) Dunbar, lived in West Roxbury. In May of 1937, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert 476 Beacon from a single-family dwelling into twelve apartments.

On July 25, 1957, 476 Beacon was purchased from James Dunbar by Lenk Properties, Inc., owned by real estate developer Richard Van Siclen Lenk.

On December 26, 1984, Lenk Properties transferred 476 Beacon to Richard Lenk as part of the liquidation of the company. Richard Lenk died in March of 1994.

On December 28, 2012, 476 Beacon was acquired from the Richard Van S. Lenk Trust by the 476 Beacon Street LLC (James Keliher, manager of record.

In February of 2013, the 476 Beacon Street LLC applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert 476 Beacon into four units and construct a garage at the rear of the property.

On September 29, 2014, the 476 Beacon Street LLC converted the property into four condominium units, the 476 Beacon Street Condominium.