314 Beacon

314 Beacon (2015)

Lot 18' x 150' (2,700 sf)

Lot 18′ x 150′ (2,700 sf)

314 Beacon is located on the north side of Beacon, between Exeter and Fairfield, with 312 Beacon to the east and 316 Beacon to the west.

314 Beacon was built ca. 1871, one of two contiguous houses (312-314 Beacon) designed as a symmetrical pair.

It appears likely that 312-314 Beacon were built by Daniel Davies, a housewright and master carpenter, for speculative sale.  Daniel Davies entered into a party wall agreement with the Boston and Roxbury Mill Corporation on November 23, 1871, and Daniel Davies and Son is shown as the owner of both houses (and of 308-310 Beacon, also built ca. 1871) on the 1874 Hopkins map.  In his Houses of Boston’s Back Bay, Bainbridge Bunting does not attribute 312-314 Beacon to a specific architect, but it is likely that they were designed by Charles K. Kirby, whom Bunting indicates designed 308-310 Beacon.

314 Beacon was not listed in the 1876 and 1877 Boston Blue Books.

By the 1877-1878 winter season, it was the home of Susan Lucy (Fellowes) Williams, the widow of George Foster Williams, a real estate broker and investor.  She previously had lived on Llewellyn Avenue.

B. Cory, trustees, et al, are shown as the owners on the 1883 Bromley map, and J. D. Williams, trustee, is shown as the owners on the 1888, 1898, 1908, and 1912 maps.  J. D. Williams probably was George Williams’s nephew, John Davis Williams (the son of John Davis Williams), who was a real estate trustee.

312-314 Beacon (2015)

Susan Williams continued to live there until her death in January of 1915.

Her daughter, Lucy Lambert (Williams) Harding, et al, trustees, are shown as the owners on the 1917 Bromley map.

The house was not listed in the 1916-1922 Blue Books.

By 1922, 314 Beacon was owned by George A. Kissock, a real estate dealer.

In the summer of 1922, 314 Beacon was purchased from George Kissock by Leo Shlick and his wife, Charlotte (Lénard) Shlick.  The sale was reported by the Boston Globe on August 25, 1922.  They previously had lived at 657 Boylston.  L. and C. Shlick are shown as the owners on the 1928 Bromley map.  Leo Shlick was an architect and paper mill engineer.

In September of 1922, Leo Shlick applied for (and subsequently received) permission to remodel the interior, probably in preparation for making it their home.  In November of 1929, Charlotte Shlick applied for (and subsequently received) permission to add a one-car garage at the rear.

The Shlicks operated 314 Beacon as a lodging house.

312-314 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

312-314 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

In August of 1933, Charlotte Shlick applied for permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into ten apartments, including providing for a basement level front entrance.  She subsequently abandoned the permit.

They continued to live there until about 1934.

The house was not listed in the 1935-1937 Blue Books, and was shown as vacant in the 1935 City Directory.

By October of 1935, 314 Beacon was owned by the Home Savings Bank.  In October of 1935, it applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into six apartments.

In May of 1936, Lillian Chandler purchased 314 Beacon from the Home Savings Bank.  Lillian Y. Chandler, et al, are shown as the owners on the 1938 Bromley map.

By 1945, 314 Beacon was owned by Sarah B. Ransom.  In February of 1945, she applied for (and subsequently received) permission to repair fire damage to the apartment on the first floor in the front of the building.

The property changed hands and in July of 1986 was purchased by John R. Robinson and William Schwartz, trustees under a trust dated July 1, 1986.  In August of 1986, they converted the property into six condominiums, the Riverview Condominium.

In July of 1991, Rafael Tallada, a unit owner, applied for (and subsequently received) permission to replace the existing one-car garage with a four-car garage with a roof deck on top.  On the same day, he also applied for (and subsequently received) permission to add one additional window to the dormer at the rear of the top floor.

In February of 1998, the 314 Beacon Street Trust applied for (and subsequently received) permission to remodel the building and reduce the number of units from six to four.

310-330 Beacon, looking west (2013)

310-330 Beacon, looking west (2013)