429 Marlborough

429 Marlborough (2014)

429 Marlborough (2014)

Lot 24' x 75' (1,800 sf)

Lot 24′ x 75′ (1,800 sf)

429 Marlborough is located on the north side of Marlborough, between Massachusetts Avenue and Charlesgate East, with 427 Marlborough to the east and 431 Marlborough to the west.

429 Marlborough was designed by architect Obed F. Smith and built in 1886-1887 by Charles A. Dodge, builder, one of three contiguous houses (425-427-429 Marlborough) built for building contractor George Wheatland, Jr., for speculative sale. He is shown as the owner on the original building permit applications for all three houses, all dated October 14, 1886.

As originally built, all three were three stories in height, probably all of the design which survives at 429 Marlborough. By the mid-1890s, and possibly even before they were occupied, additional stories had been added to 425 and 427 Marlborough. All three houses show as 3 story houses on the original permit application and on the 1887 Sanborn map, but 425 and 427 Marlborough show as having four stories on the 1897 Sanborn map and 1898 Bromley map.

By the 1888-1889 winter season, 429 Marlborough was the home of Elizabeth Sumner (Lewis) Nourse, the wife of Thorndike Nourse, and their daughter, Annie Endicott Nourse. Elizabeth Nourse’s brother, George Lewis et al, trustees, are shown as the owners of 429 Marlborough on the 1888, 1898, 1908, and 1917 Bromley maps.

The Nourses previously had lived in Detroit, where Thorndike Nourse was a book binder, printer, and publisher. It appears that Thorndike and Elizabeth Nourse opted to live apart, she in Boston and he in Europe, where she visited frequently. He died in Quimper, France, in July of 1904.

During the 1891-1892 and 1892-1893 winter seasons, while Elizabeth and Annie Nourse were in Europe, 429 Marlborough was the home of real estate investor Russell Sturgis Codman and his wife Anna K. (Crafts) Codman. They had married in August of 1891 and 429 Marlborough probably was their first home together. They had moved by the 1893-1894 season, and by the 1894-1895 season were living at 14 Gloucester.

429 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

429 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

During the 1899-1900 winter season, when Elizabeth and Annie Nourse were again traveling in Europe, 429 Marlborough was the home of William Branford Shubrick Clymer and his wife, Katherine McCall (Livingston) Clymer. An architect by training, he had been an instructor in English at Harvard and then became a writer on literary subjects. By the 1900-1901 winter season they were living at 30 Chestnut.

And during the 1904-1905 winter season, when Elizabeth and Annie Nourse probably were once again in Europe (following Thorndike Nourse’s death in July of 1904), 429 Marlborough was the home of retired railroad and iron mining developer Joseph Lincoln Colby and his wife, Mary C. (Little) Colby. Their usual home was in Newton Centre.

Elizabeth Nourse died in January of 1916. Annie Endicott Thorndike continued to live at 429 Marlborough until about 1942, when she moved to an apartment at 282 Beacon. John Heard et al, trustees, are shown as the owners of 429 Marlborough on the 1928 and 1938 Bromley maps.

By 1942, 429 Marlborough was the home of Dr. Henry Mayor Landesman and his wife, Eleanor D. (Peterson) Landesman. They previously had lived in an apartment at 366 Commonwealth, and prior to that at 424 Marlborough.

Henry Landesman was a physician and also maintained his office at 429 Marlborough.

He died in May of 1946. After his death, Eleanor Landesman continued to live at 429 Marlborough. In July of 1947, she applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into a single-family dwelling and lodging house.

In 1948, Eleanor Landesman married again, to Arthur Michael Gold. After their marriage, they lived briefly at 429 Marlborough, but had moved by 1949.

In August of 1948, Lawrence Foster and his wife, Ruth (Gaston) Howard Foster, acquired 429 Marlborough from Arthur M. Gold. They also maintained a home in Manchester which appears to have been their primary residence during World War II, in which Lawrence Foster served as a Lt. Colonel in the US Army. Until about 1943, they had lived at 177 Marlborough.

Lawrence Foster was an attorney and, from 1948 until about 1964, served in the Boston office of the Central Intelligence Agency.

In September of 1948, Ruth Foster filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert 429 Marlborough back into a single-family dwelling.

Lawrence Foster died in July of 1968. Ruth Foster continued to live at 429 Marlborough until her death in August of 1974.

In April of 1976, Eugene L. Metz purchased 429 Marlborough from the estate of Ruth Foster (Augustus P. Loring, Lawrence Coolidge, and Walter Karri-Davis, executors).

In December of 1986, architects Fred Koetter and Susie Kim, husband and wife, purchased 429 Marlborough from Eugene Metz. In December of 1988, Fred Koetter applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into a three-family dwelling.

429 Marlborough subsequently changed hands. It remained a three-family dwelling in 2014.