482 Beacon

482 Beacon (2015)

482 Beacon (2015)

Lot 22.6' x 150' (3,390 sf))

Lot 22.6′ x 150′ (3,390 sf))

482 Beacon is located on north side of Beacon, between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue, with 480 Beacon to the east and 484 Beacon to the west.

482 Beacon was designed by Ernest N. Boyden, architect, and built in 1892-1893 by Eugene H. Fay, builder, probably for speculative sale, one of five contiguous houses (482-484-486-488-490 Beacon).  He is shown as the owner on the original building permit applications for 484-490 Beacon, all dated June 11, 1892 (the application for 482 Beacon has not been located).

By the 1893-1894 winter season, 482 Beacon was the home of Alonzo Gifford Van Nostrand and his wife, Sarah (Sadie) Gertrude (Foque) Van Nostrand.  They previously had lived at 286 Newbury.

Alonzo Van Nostrand was a brewer, proprietor of the Bunker Hill Brewery in Charlestown.

Architectural rendering of north and south façades of proposed garage at 482 Beacon (1904), by Leon N. Gillette, courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department

Architectural rendering of north and south façades of proposed garage at 482 Beacon (1904), by Leon N. Gillette, courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department

In October of 1904, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to construct a garage at the rear of the property. Plans for the garage, designed by New York architect Leon N. Gillette, are included in the City of Boston Blueprints Collection in the Boston Public Library’s Arts Department (reference BIN A-98).

Alonzo Van Nostrand is shown as the owner of 482 Beacon on the 1908 Bromley map.

Sarah Van Nostrand died in April of 1905.  Alonzo Van Nostrand remarried in August of 1907 to Mrs. Jane (Jennie/Jeannie) Bradford (Eldridge) Taylor, the former wife of George F. Taylor.  After their marriage, they lived at 482 Beacon. Jane B. Van Nostrand is shown as the owner on the 1917 Bromley map and was the assessed owner through 1922.

The Van Nostrands continued to live there in 1920, but had moved to New Bedford by 1921.

The house was not listed in the 1921-1924 Blue Books.

In 1923, 482 Beacon was the home of Mrs. Annie Jane (Trimble) Varnum, the widow of John R. Varney, who operated it as a lodging house.  In 1920, she had lived at 139 Newbury, where she also had operated a lodging house.  She was the assessed owner of 482 Beacon in 1923.  By 1924, she had moved to 272 Newbury.

482-490 Beacon (ca. 1925), William T. Clark, photographer; courtesy of Historic New England

482-490 Beacon (ca. 1925), William T. Clark, photographer; courtesy of Historic New England

Among Mrs. Varney’s lodgers in 1923 were John L. Dion and his wife, Emma (Chevalier) Dion.  They previously had lived in Norwood.  He was a janitor and may have managed 482 Beacon for Mrs. Varney.  By the 1923-1924 winter season, they had moved to 228 Commonwealth.

By 1924, 482 Beacon wasthe home of Louis H. Schneider, a clergyman, and his wife, Eunice E. (Mann) Schneider.  They previously had lived in Brookline.  Louis H. Schneider et al, trustees, were the assessed owners of 482 Beacon from 1924 through 1928 and are shown as the owners on the 1928 Bromley map.

Architectural rendering of proposed front elevation of 482 Beacon (1928), by Edward T. P. Graham, courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department

Architectural rendering of proposed front elevation of 482 Beacon (1928), by Edward T. P. Graham, courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department

In March of 1924, Louis Schneider applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into a church and community house.  Thereafter, it became the location of The House of Faith and The Church Invisible, of which he served as minister.  He also was editor of The Spoken Word.

The Schneiders continued to live at 482 Beacon, and to operate The House of Faith and The Church Invisible there, during the 1927-1928 winter season, but moved thereafter to Melrose.

In 1928, 482 Beacon was acquired by Dr. Joseph Stanton, a surgeon and later chief of staff at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Brighton.  He and his wife, Mary Elizabeth (Sullivan) Stanton, lived in Newton.

482 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

482 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

He converted the property into medical offices, including lowering the front entrance to street level and adding a fifth story.  Plans for the remodeling, designed by architect Edward T. P. Graham, are included in the City of Boston Blueprints Collection in the Boston Public Library’s Arts Department (reference BIN O-24).  Dr.  Stanton maintained his office at 482 Beacon.

He continued to own the property at the time of his death in January of 1954.

By 1962, 482 Beacon was owned by Bryan Angel.  In September of 1962, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from medical offices into twelve apartments.

The property changed hands and in December of 1971 was acquired by Harold Brown.  In June of 1973, Harold Brown, as trustee of the 482 Beacon Street Trust, transferred the property to Elaine G. Frantzis.  On the same day, she transferred 4/5th interest in the property back to Harold Brown, 1/10th interest to Ronald Brown, and 1/10th interest to Charles Brown.  Charles Brown subsequently died and in August of 1974, his widow, Arlene Ruth (Silverman) Brown, transferred his 1/10th interest in the property to Harold and Ronald Brown.

In February of 1982, Harold and Ronald Brown converted the property into twelve condominium units, the 482 Beacon Street Condominium.

482-490 Beacon (2013)

482-490 Beacon (2013)