175 Marlborough

175 Marlborough (2013)

175 Marlborough (2013)

Lot 25' x 112' (2,800 sf)

Lot 25′ x 112′ (2,800 sf)

175 Marlborough is located on the north side of Marlborough, between Dartmouth and Exeter, with 173 Marlborough to the east and 177 Marlborough to the west.

175 Marlborough was built for building contractor Silas Whiton Merrill ca. 1871, probably for speculative sale, one of two contiguous houses (175-177 Marlborough).

By 1873, 175 Marlborough was the home of commission merchant Charles Lowell Andrews and his wife, Sarah (Jeffries) Andrews.  He is shown as the owner on the 1874 Hopkins map and the 1883 Bromley map.  In 1872, they had lived at 220 Beacon.

From about 1878, Rev. Phillips Brooks, Rector of Trinity Church, also lived at 175 Marlborough.  He continued to live there in 1880, but moved soon thereafter to the newly-completed Trinity Church Rectory at 233 Clarendon.

During the 1880-1881 winter season, the Andrewses were joined at 175 Marlborough by merchant and ship owner George Bruce Upton, Jr., and his wife, Geraldine Ipolite (Russell) Rivers Upton. They had lived at 105 Marlborough during the previous season. They also maintained a home in Milton. They had moved from 175 Marlborough by the next season, and by the 1882-1883 season were living at 171 Marlborough.

The Andrewses continued to live at 175 Marlborough until the 1881-1882 winter season, but moved soon thereafter to Milton.

In 1882, 175 Marlborough was the home of Richard Olney and his wife Agnes (Thomas) Olney.  They had lived in Forest Hills in 1880.

Richard Olney was an attorney and later would become US Attorney General and Secretary of State under President Grover Cleveland.

By 1883, they had moved to 241 Marlborough.

By the 1883-1884 winter season, 175 Marlborough was the home of George Quincy Thorndike , an artist, and his wife, Ellen (Lewis) Thorndike.

175-177 Marlborough (2013)

175-177 Marlborough (2013)

George Thorndike died in December of 1886, and Ellen Thorndike continued to live at 175 Marlborough.  The Heirs of George Thorndike are shown as the owners on the 1888 Bromley map, C. U. Cotting et al, trustees, arte shown as the owners on the 1890 and 1898 maps, and Moses Williams et al, trustees are shown as the owners on the 1908 and 1917 maps.

During the 1898-1899 winter season, Mrs. Thorndike was living elsewhere and 175 Marlborough was the home of her son-in-law and daughter, John Brooks Fenno, Jr., and Mary Hamilton (Thorndike) Fenno.  They had lived at 254 Beacon earlier in 1898.  J. Brooks Fenno was a dealer in iron and coke.

In late 1898, the Fennos purchased and moved to 255 Commonwealth. Ellen Thorndike resumed living at 175 Marlborough.

During the 1901-1902 winter season, Mrs. Thorndike once again was living elsewhere and 175 Marlborough was the home of Louis Cabot and his wife, Amy (Hemenway) Cabot.  They also maintained homes in Brookline and Dover, New Hampshire.

By 1903, Ellen Thorndike was living at 175 Marlborough again.  She continued to live there until her death in November of 1915.

175 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

175 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

By the 1916-1917 winter season, 175 Marlborough had become the home of her son, Harry Hill Thorndike, an architect, and his wife, Lucy Barney (Gurnee) Thorndike.  They had been living in France and had returned in about 1915, after which they lived in Newport and probably also lived at 175 Marlborough with his mother.  He is shown as the owner on the 1928 and 1938 Bromley maps.  They also continued to maintain a home in Newport and later also in Bar Harbor.

During the 1924-1925 winter season, the Thorndikes were traveling abroad and 175 Marlborough was the home of Frederic Munroe Burnham, a stockbroker and trustee, and his wife, Rosamond (Eliot) Burnham.  They previously had lived in Manchester.  By the 1925-1926 season, they had moved to 291 Commonwealth and the Thorndikes were living at 175 Marlborough again.

Harry Thorndike died in April of 1938.  Lucy Thorndike continued to live at 175 Marlborough until her death in June of 1967.

In February of 1968, Leo T. Hart, trustee of the 175 Marlboro Trust, acquired 175 Marlborough.  In January of 1968 (prior to the date of his purchase), he filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into seven apartments.

In December of 1977, John V. O’Neil, trustee of the 175 Marlboro Street Trust, purchased 175 Marlborough from Leo T. Hart.  In May of 1978, he filed for (and subsequently received) permission to reduce the number of apartments from seven to five, and that same month he converted the apartments into five condominiums

In June of 1985, the 175 Marlborough Street Trust filed for (and subsequently received) permission to reduce the number of units from five to four.  In August of 1988, Gwen Mitchell filed for (and subsequently received) permission to increase the number of units from four to five.  And in June of 1991, Robert Williams filed for (and subsequently received) permission to reduce the number of units from five to three.