357 Beacon

357 Beacon (2013)

357 Beacon (2013)

Lot 20' x 112' (2,240 sf)

Lot 20′ x 112′ (2,240 sf)

357 Beacon is located on the south side of Beacon, between Fairfield and Gloucester, with 355 Beacon to the east and 359 Beacon to the west.

357 Beacon was designed by architect Carl Fehmer and built in 1885-1886 by James Smith, builder, one of two contiguous houses (357-359 Beacon) designed as a symmetrical pair.

357 Beacon was built as the home of insurance broker Henry Rogers Dalton and his wife, Florence (Chapman) Dalton.  He is shown as the owner on the original building permit application, dated June 8, 1885.  They previously had lived at 288 Marlborough.  They continued to live at 357 Beacon during the 1886-1887 winter season, but moved thereafter to 507 Beacon.

By the 1887-1888 winter season, 357 Beacon was the home of Mary Elizabeth (Fearing) Leeds, widow of merchant James Leeds, Jr.  In 1885, she had lived at 188 Beacon.  Mary E. Leeds et al, trustees, are shown as the owners of 357 Beacon on the 1888, 1890, and 1895 Bromley maps.

Her son, Herbert Corey Leeds, lived with her until about 1893, when he moved to 15 Blagden.  He later would become a noted yachtsman, author, and designer of golf courses.

Mary Leeds continued to live at 357 Beacon during the 1891-1892 winter season, but then lived elsewhere for the next two seasons.

During the 1892-1893 winter season, 357 Beacon was the home of  cotton manufacturer John Whittemore Farwell and his wife, Ruby Frances (Howe) Farwell.  They also maintained a home in Melrose.  By the 1893-1894 season, the had moved to 457 Beacon.

357-359 Beacon (2013)

357-359 Beacon (2013)

During the 1893-1894 winter season, 357 Beacon was the home of merchant Benjamin Loring Young and his wife, Charlotte (Hubbard) Young.  During the 1892-1893 winter season, they had lived at 227 Beacon.  They also maintained a home in Weston.  By 1895, they had moved to 254 Beacon.

By the 1894-1895 winter season, Mary Leeds was living at 357 Beacon once again.  She continued to live there during the 1895-1896 season, but moved thereafter.

The house was not listed in the 1897 Blue Book.

During the 1897-1898 winter season, 357 Beacon was the Boston home of William Croad Lovering, a textile manufacturer from Taunton who had been elected to Congress in 1896.  He was a widower. In 1897, he had lived at 217 Beacon.

In the fall of 1898, 357 Beacon was purchased from the James Leeds estate (Mary Leeds, trustee) by the B. Loring estate, which is shown as the owner on the 1898 Bromley map.  The transaction was reported in the Boston Globe on October 2, 1898.

By 1899, 357 Beacon was the home of Robert Hooper Stevenson and his wife, Caroline James (Young) Stevenson.  In 1898, they had lived at 9 Exeter.  They also maintained a summer home in Nahant.  Caroline Stevenson was the sister of Benjamin Loring Young, who had lived at 357 Beacon with his wife, Charlotte, during the 1893-1894 winter season.

Robert Stevenson was treasurer of the Lowell Machine Company.  He served in the Civil War and was brevetted a Brigadier General.

Charles L. Young et al, trustees, are shown as the owners of 357 Beacon on the 1908 and 1917 Bromley maps.

357-359 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

357-359 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

Caroline Stevenson died in 1922, and Robert Stevenson continued to live at 357 Beacon until his death in May of 1928.

Robert H. Stevenson, Jr., et al, trustees, are shown as the owners on the 1928 Bromley map.

The house was not listed in the 1929 and 1930 Blue Books.

By 1930, it was the home of Adelard Monet and his wife, Eugenie (Asselin) Montet.  They also maintained a summer home in Nahant.  He was the assessed owner of 357 Beacon from 1930.

Adelard Monet was a dealer in furniture and household goods.

In April of 1930, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to install fire escapes at the rear of the building, connecting with 359 Beacon.  The application states that 357 Beacon was occupied as a lodging house.

Eugenie Monet died in 1933.

In 1934, 357 Beacon was acquired, probably through foreclosure, by the Union Savings Bank, which was the assessed owner from 1935.

Adelard Monet continued to live at 357 Beacon and to operate it as a lodging house.  By 1936, he had acquired 377 Beacon, where he also operated a lodging house.  He continued to live at 357 Beacon until about 1939.  By 1940, he had moved to 377 Beacon.

On the 1938 Bromley map, the Union Savings Bank is shown as the owner of 357 Beacon, and Adelard Monet is shown as the owner of 377 Beacon.

In 1940, 357 Beacon was acquired by John Philip Manning, a salesman, and his wife, Marion C. (McDonald) Dutton Manning, who continued to operate it as a lodging house.  They were the assessed owners of 357 Beacon from 1941.  They also owned 359 Beacon, where they lived and operated a lodging house.

In 1943, 357 and 359 Beacon were acquired by real estate broker and investor Edward Swartz, who was the assessed owner from 1944.  They continued to be operated as lodging houses.  In December of 1953, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to cut through doors in the party wall between 357 and 359 Beacon.

357-359 Beacon both continued to be operated as lodging houses.  The legal occupancy of 357 Beacon, however, was as a single-family dwelling.

By 1972, Edward Swartz had leased 357-359 Beacon to Emerson College for use as a dormitory.

In July of 1981, the Estate of Edward Swartz filed for (and subsequently received) permission to combine 357 and 359 Beacon, converting the combined building into eight apartments.

In September of 1981, Jonathan G. Davis, trustee of the Three Fifty Seven Realty Trust, purchased 357 and 359 Beacon from the Estate of Edward Swartz.

In December of 1982, he converted the properties into seven condominium units — four units at 357 Beacon and three units at 359 Beacon — the Three Fifty Seven Beacon Condominium.