434 Marlborough

434 Marlborough (2014)

434 Marlborough (2014)

Irregular Lot: By two lines on Marlborough, 21.11' and 1.11' (1,794 sf)

Irregular Lot: By two lines on Marlborough, 21.11′ and 1.11′ (1,794 sf)

434 Marlborough is located on the south side of Marlborough, between Massachusetts Avenue and Charlesgate East, with 432 Marlborough to the east, and 436 Marlborough to the west.

434 Marlborough was designed by architect Obed F. Smith and built in 1885-1886 by Charles H. Dodge, mason, for building contractor George Wheatland, Jr., for speculative sale, one of six contiguous houses (430-432-434-436-438-440 Marlborough), arranged in a symmetrical group, the three to the east (430-434 Marlborough) with bays on the eastern side, and the three to the west (436-440 Marlborough) with bays on the western side. The peaks of the bays have varied designs. George Wheatland, Jr., is shown as the owner on the original building permit for 434 Marlborough, dated October 16, 1885.  At the same time, George Wheatland, Jr., was having six more houses built at 381-391 Commonwealth on the lots to the south, behind 430-440 Marlborough, also designed by Obed Smith and built by Charles Dodge.

By the 1886-1887 winter season, 434 Marlborough was the home of Warren Bailey Potter Weeks and his wife, Gertrude Carruth (Washburn) Weeks. They had married in December of 1885, and 434 Marlborough probably was their first home together. He was an insurance and real estate broker.

Warren and Gertrude Weeks continued to live at 434 Marlborough during the 1892-1893 winter season, but moved thereafter to 467 Commonwealth.

434 Marlborough was not listed in the 1894 and 1895 Blue Books.

By the 1895-1896 winter season, 434 Marlborough was the home of Edward Henry Clement and his wife, Gertrude (Pound) Clement. They previously had lived in Brookline. Gertrude Clement is shown as the owner of 434 Marlborough on the 1895 and 1898 Bromley maps.

Edward Clement was editor-in-chief of the Boston Transcript.

Gertrude Clement died in December of 1896. Charles Clement continued to live at 434 Marlborough and in March of 1898 married again, to Mrs. Josephine (Hill) Russell, the widow of Charles G. Russell. After their marriage, they lived at 434 Marlborough until 1900, when they moved to Brookline.

By the 1900-1901 winter season, 434 Marlborough was the home of attorney Causten Browne and his wife, Katharine Eveleth (Maynadier) Browne. They had lived at The Kensington at 687 Boylston in 1900. Katharine Browne’s brother and sister-in-law, James Eveleth Maynadier and Mary West (Wright) Maynadier, lived at 432 Marlborough.

424-436 Marlborough, with 416 Marlborough in the distance (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

424-436 Marlborough, with 416 Marlborough in the distance (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

The Brownes continued to live at 434 Marlborough during the 1903-1904 winter season, but moved thereafter to Brookline. The Maynadiers also moved to Brookline at about that time.

By the 1904-1905 winter season, 434 Marlborough was the home of Dr. Ernest Boyen Young, a physician and instructor at Harvard Medical School, and his wife, Grace Adams (Simonton) Young. He also maintained his medical office there. They previously had lived (and he had maintained his office) in an apartment at 499 Beacon.

In 1905, the Youngs were joined at 434 Marlborough by Ernest Young’s brother, Arthur Jewett Young, an attorney, and Dr. John Dresser Adams, a physician, who also maintained his office there. By 1906, Arthur Young had moved to 2 Brimmer and John Adams had moved to 925 Boylston.

Thomas Hunt is shown as the owner of 434 Marlborough on the 1908 Bromley map. Grace Young is shown as the owner on the 1912 and 1917 maps.

Ernest Young died in January of 1923. Grace Young and their only son, Charles Simonton Young, moved soon thereafter to an apartment at 416 Marlborough.

By the 1923-1924 winter season, 434 Marlborough was the home of attorney Laurence Allyn Brown and his wife, Harriet Addams (Young) Brown. They previously had lived at 127 Pinckney. They also maintained a home at Bass Rocks in Gloucester.

Laurence Brown died in July of 1937. Harriet Brown continued to live at 434 Marlborough with their two children, Laurence Allyn Brown, Jr., and Dorothy Addams Brown.

Harriet Brown died in 1952. Laurence Brown, Jr., an attorney, and Dorothy Brown, a bank executive, continued to live at 434 Marlborough.

Laurence Brown died in January of 1983. Dorothy Brown continued to lived at 434 Marlborough.

In January of 1985, Barry D. Libert, trustee of the 434 Marlborough Street Realty Trust, purchased 434 Marlborough from Dorothy Brown. In May of 1985, Barry Libert transferred the property to himself and Ellen Marcus Libert.

Also in May of 1985, Milestone Associates (presumably on behalf of the Liberts) applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the house from a single-family dwelling into a two-family dwelling. They also received permission to add a roof deck, a steel deck off of the rear at the first floor level, an oriel window and door at the kitchen, and a new french door in the rear at the ground floor level.

In August of 1988, Stuart L. Schreiber and Mimi S. Packman purchased 434 Marlborough from Barry and Ellen Libert.

In July of 2003, Ellen Driggin, wife of Seth Driggin. purchased 434 Marlborough from Stuart Scheiber and Mimi Packman.

In September of 2004, Ellen Driggin entered into a “Preservation Restriction Agreement” with the National Architectural Trust, Inc., for the purpose of ensuring preservation of 434 Marlborough’s exterior.

434 Marlborough subsequently changed hands. It remained a two-family dwelling in 2014.

432-436 Marlborough (2014)

432-436 Marlborough (2014)