436 Marlborough

436 Marlborough (2014)

436 Marlborough (2014)

Irregular Lot: 22.62' on Marlborough (1,718 sf)

Irregular Lot: 22.62′ on Marlborough (1,718 sf)

436 Marlborough is located on the south side of Marlborough, between Massachusetts Avenue and Charlesgate East, with 434 Marlborough to the east, and 438 Marlborough to the west.

436 Marlborough was designed by architect Obed F. Smith and built in 1885-1886 by Charles H. Dodge, mason, for building contractor George Wheatland, Jr., for speculative sale, one of six contiguous houses (430-432-434-436-438-440 Marlborough), arranged in a symmetrical group, the three to the east (430-434 Marlborough) with bays on the eastern side, and the three to the west (436-440 Marlborough) with bays on the western side. The peaks of the bays have varied designs. George Wheatland, Jr., is shown as the owner on the original building permit for 436 Marlborough, dated October 16, 1885. At the same time, George Wheatland, Jr., was having six more houses built at 381-391 Commonwealth on the lots to the south, behind 430-440 Marlborough, also designed by Obed Smith and built by Charles Dodge.

By the 1887-1888 winter season, 436 Marlborough was the home of oil merchant John Kehew and his wife, Nancy T. (Cummings) Kehew. They previously had lived on Grampian Way. Nancy Kehew is shown as the owner of 436 Marlborough on the 1888 Bromley map.

John Kehew died in February of 1889. Nancy Kehew moved soon thereafter.

By the 1889-1890 winter season, 436 Marlborough was the home of William Thomas Lambert and his wife, Grace T. (Haley) Lambert. They previously had lived at 259 Walnut Avenue. Grace Lambert is shown as the owner of 436 Marlborough on the 1895 Bromley map.

William Lambert was manager of the Leonard Silk Company.

They continued to live at 436 Marlborough during the 1894-1895 winter season, but moved back to 259 Walnut Avenue soon thereafter.

436 Marlborough was not listed in the 1896 Blue Book.

By mid-1896, 436 Marlborough was the home of Thomas Tracy Bouvé, treasurer of the Glendon Iron Works and formerly a commission merchant, and his wife, Emily Gilbert (Lincoln) Bouvé. They previously had lived at 40 Newbury. They also maintained a home in Hingham.

424-436 Marlborough, with 416 Marlborough in the distance (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

424-436 Marlborough, with 416 Marlborough in the distance (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

Thomas Bouvé died in June of 1896. Emily Bouvé continued to live at 436 Marlborough and in Hingham. Their son, Walter Lincoln Bouvé, trustee, is shown as the owner of 436 Marlborough on the 1898 Bromley map.

Emily Bouvé died in February of 1903. The Heirs of Emily Bouvé are shown as the owners on the 1908 and 1912 Bromley maps, and Walter L. Bouvé et al are shown as the owners on the 1917, 1928, and 1938 Bromley maps.

By the 1903-1904 winter season, 436 Marlborough was the home of Dr. Joseph William Courtney, a physician specializing in nervous disorders, and his wife, Margaret C. (Flynn) Courtney. He also maintained his medical office at 436 Marlborough. They previously had lived (and he had maintained his office) at 409 Marlborough.

They continued to live at 436 Marlborough during the 1915-1916 winter season, but moved thereafter to 94 Bay State Road.

436 Marlborough was not listed in the 1917-1920 Blue Books.

By the 1920-1921 winter season, 436 Marlborough was the home of Louis (Lewis) Clinton Porter, a salesman, and his wife, Ella Frances (Wood) Porter, who operated it as a lodging house. They previously had lived at 119 Hemenway.

Louis Porter died in January of 1930 and Ella Porter moved soon thereafter; she died in October of 1931.

During the 1930-1931 winter season, 436 Marlborough was the home of Mrs. Flora E. (Clifford) Speed, the widow of David George Speed, and their son, Shirley Clifford Speed. They operated 436 Marlborough as a lodging house. They previously had lived at 17 Hemenway.

S. Clifford Speed was a real estate dealer who converted many Back Bay properties into lodging houses.

By 1931, they had moved to 40 Fenway.

By 1932, 436 Marlborough was the home of William Robert MacLennan, a machinist, and his wife, Matilda M. (Vickers) MacLennan, who operated it as a lodging house. They previously had lived at 16 Bostonia. They continued to lived at 436 Marlborough until about 1937. By 1940, they were living in Arlington.

436 Marlborough remained a lodging house, with different operators, until the mid-1970s.

By 1972, 436 Marlborough was owned by Joseph A. Marshall, trustee of the Restrom Trust. In April of 1977, the Restrom Trust filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert 436 Marlborough into six apartments.

In April of 1978, the Beacon Capital Corporation foreclosed on its mortgage to Joseph Marshall and took possession of 436 Marlborough..

In June of 1978, Peter P. Papesch purchased 436 Marlborough from the Beacon Capital Corporation. In September of 1978, he filed for (and subsequently received) permission to reduce the number of units from six to three.

In July of 1979, he converted the property into three condominium units, the 436 Marlborough Street Condominium.

432-436 Marlborough (2014)

432-436 Marlborough (2014)