7 Fairfield

7 Fairfield (2013)

7 Fairfield (2013)

Lot 29.92' x 55.33' (1,655 sf)

Lot 29.92′ x 55.33′ (1,655 sf)

7 Fairfield is located on the west side of Fairfield, between Marlborough and Commonwealth, with 282 Marlborough to the north and 9 Fairfield to the south.

7 Fairfield was designed by Ware and Van Brunt, architects, and built for building contractor George Martin Gibson ca. 1872, probably for speculative sale, one of two contiguous houses (7-9 Fairfield).  At about the same time, Ware and Van Brunt also designed six additional houses for George Gibson, 282 Marlborough (contiguous with 7-9 Fairfield but in a different style) and 284-286-288-290-292 Marlborough.

By 1873, 7 Fairfield was the home of Mrs. Susan Margaret (Benjamin) Stackpole, the widow of attorney John Lewis Stackpole.  In 1870, she had lived at 96 Charles.  She is shown as the owner of 7 Fairfield on the 1874 Hopkins map and on the 1883, 1888, and 1895 Bromley maps.

Mrs. Stackpole’s unmarried sons, Henry and William, lived with her.  Henry Stackpole, a banker, married in July of 1875 to Bessie Value.  They may have lived at 7 Fairfield briefly after their marriage, but by the 1876-1877 winter season they were living at 313 Beacon.

7 Fairfield and Fairfield façade of 282 Marlborough (2013)

7 Fairfield and Fairfield façade of 282 Marlborough (2013)

William Stackpole, a wholesale dry goods merchant and later a cotton broker, never married and continued to live with his mother at 7 Fairfield until her death in April of 1896.  He then moved to an apartment at The Tuileries at 270 Commonwealth.

By the 1896-1897 winter season, 7 Fairfield was the  home of Miss Anna (Hannah) Sears Amory, the daughter of textile manufacturer William Amory, Jr.  She previously had lived with her father at 478 Beacon; a widower, he had remarried in July of 1896 and Anna Amory moved soon thereafter.   She is shown as the owner of 7 Fairfield on the 1898 Bromley map.  In May of 1898, she married Rev. George Francis Weld, an Episcopal clergyman, and moved to Cambridge.

By the 1898-1899 winter season, 7 Fairfield was the home of Ezra Ripley Thayer, an attorney and later Dean of Harvard Law School, and his wife Ethel Randolph (Clark) Thayer.  They had been married in June of 1898 and 7 Fairfield probably was their first home together. They continued to live there during the 1900-1901 winter season, after which they moved to a new home they had built at 77 Bay State Road.

In the fall of 1901, 7 Fairfield was purchased from Anna (Amory) Weld by Dr. Robert Williamson Lovett, a physician and orthopedic surgeon, and his wife, Elizabeth Moorfield (Storey) Lovett.  The sale was reported by the Boston Globe on October 9, 1901.  They previously had lived at 234 Marlborough, which they continued to own and where Dr. Lovett continued to maintain his medical office.  Elizabeth Lovett is shown as the owner of both 7 Fairfield and 234 Marlborough on the 1908, 1912, 1917, 1928, and 1938 Bromley maps.

7 Fairfield was remodeled, probably between 1908 and 1912, to add a fourth story (the house is shown as being three stories on the 1908 Bromley map and four stories on the 1912 map).

Robert Lovett died in July of 1924.

7-9 Fairfield and Fairfield façade of 282 Marlborough (2013)

7-9 Fairfield and Fairfield façade of 282 Marlborough (2013)

During the 1924-1925 winter season, Elizabeth Lovett was living elsewhere and 7 Fairfield was the home of banker Arnold Welles Hunnewell and his wife, Mary Copley (Amory) Hunnewell.  During the previous season, they had lived at 20 Hereford.  They also maintained a home in Wellesley.  By the 1925-1926 season, they had moved to 261 Commonwealth.

During the 1925-1926 winter season, Elizabeth Lovett was living at 7 Fairfield once again.  During the next two seasons, however, she was again living elsewhere.

During the 1926-1927 winter season, 7 Fairfield was the home of wool merchant William Arthur Dupee and his wife, Clara Ethel (Purdon) Dupee.  In 1925, they had lived at 181 Commonwealth.  They also maintained a home on Brush Hill Road in Milton and a summer residence in Biddeford, Maine.  By mid-1927, they had purchased and moved to 275 Marlborough.

During the 1927-1928 winter season, 7 Fairfield was the home of Charles Frothingham Leland and his wife, Margaret Waters (Carr) Leland.  They previously had lived at 144 Marlborough.  Charles Leland owned a farm in Southborough, which also was the Lelands’ summer home.  By the 1928-1929 season, they had moved to 293 Marlborough.

By the 1928-1929 winter season, Elizabeth Lovett had resumed living at 7 Fairfield.  She also maintained a summer home in Lincoln.

Elizabeth Lovett was a leader in efforts to repeal Prohibition.

She continued to live at 7 Fairfield until her death in March of 1951.

By 1952, 7 Fairfield was owned by Hyman Goodman.  In July of 1952, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a single-family dwelling into five apartments.

The property changed hands and in August of 1971 was acquired by Richard Nemrow and Timothy H. Fife, trustees of the Seven Fairfield Realty Trust.

In March of 1992, Richard Nemrow filed for (and subsequently received) permission to legalize the occupancy as four units, noting that was the existing condition.

In July of 1999, Richard J. LeBlanc and his wife, Anna LeBlanc, purchased 7 Fairfield from Richard Nemrow and Timothy H. Fife.

In March of 2003, the LeBlancs converted 7 Fairfield into four condominiums.

7-9 Fairfield and 282 Marlborough, with 5 Fairfield in distance (ca. 1902); courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

7-9 Fairfield and 282 Marlborough, with 5 Fairfield in distance (ca. 1902); courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum