10 Charlesgate East

10 Charlesgate East (2014)

10 Charlesgate East (2014)

Irregular Lot: 45.93' on Charlesgate East and 125.33' on Marlborough (7,339 sf)

Irregular Lot: 45.93′ on Charlesgate East and 125.33′ on Marlborough (7,339 sf)

10 Charlesgate East is located on NE corner of Marlborough and Charlesgate East, with 451 Marlborough to the east, across Alley 908, 4 Charlesgate East to the north, and 24 Charlesgate East (419 Commonwealth) to the south, across Marlborough.

10 Charlesgate East (463 Marlborough) was designed by Rotch and Tilden, architects, and built in 1889 by Melville C. Grant, mason; John Rawson, carpenter, one of two contiguous houses (459 Marlborough and 10 Charlesgate East) built at about the same time for Thurlow Weed Barnes and his wife, Isabel Frances (Morris) Barnes. Isabel Morris Barnes is shown as the owner on the original building permit application for 10 Charlesgate East, dated July 29, 1889, and for 459 Marlborough, dated September 16, 1889.

Thurlow Barnes had been associated with his grandfather’s newspaper in Albany, New York. He and Isabel Morris had married in October of 1887, after which they lived in Boston and he joined the publishing firm of Houghton-Mifflin & Company. They previously had lived briefly at the Hotel Vendôme and, before that, at 247 Marlborough.

Detail of 10 Charlesgate East from J. Pickering Putnam's rendering of The Charlesgate at 4 Charlesgate East; American Architect and Building News (4Apr1891)

Detail of 10 Charlesgate East from J. Pickering Putnam’s rendering of The Charlesgate at 4 Charlesgate East; American Architect and Building News (4Apr1891)

Thurlow and Isabel Barnes moved to 10 Charlesgate East in the fall of 1891, but then moved to New York City in 1892.

In mid-1892, 10 Charlesgate East was acquired by the owners of The Charlesgate at 4 Charlesgate East (535 Beacon).

The Charlesgate was designed by architect J. Pickering Putnam, and built in 1891 by Gibson & Knight, builders, as a seven story apartment hotel. The building had entrances on both Beacon and Charlesgate East and for many years 535 Beacon was the primary entrance.

The Charlesgate was owned by members of the Putnam family, including John Pickering Putnam, Jr., the architect, and his brother-in-law and sister, Horace John Hayden and Harriet (Putnam) Hayden. The Haydens lived in New York City, where Horace Putnam was vice president of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad. “J. Pickering Putnam and others” are shown as the owners on the original building permit, dated May 28, 1891. Harriet (Putnam) Hayden, trustee, is shown as the owner of The Charlesgate on the 1895, 1908, and 1917 Bromley map.

J. Pickering Putnam and his wife, Grace Cornelia (Stevens) Putnam lived at The Charlesgate from the time it was completed. They previously had lived at The Oxford (southeast corner of Exeter and Huntington).

The Charlesgate accepted both travelers and permanent guests. The emphasis, however, was on permanent guests and, unlike the Hotel Vendôme and the Hotel Somerset, The Charlesgate did not have a ballroom or other large rooms for public events.

4 Charlesgate East (535 Beacon) and 10 Charlesgate East (ca. 1895), Detroit Publishing Co.; courtesy of the Library of Congress

4 Charlesgate East (535 Beacon) and 10 Charlesgate East (ca. 1895), Detroit Publishing Co.; courtesy of the Library of Congress

As originally designed, The Charlesgate occupied an irregularly shaped lot with frontages of about 103 feet on Beacon and 105 feet on Charlesgate East. When it acquired 10 Charlesgate East, it built additional floors to match the height of its original building. The addition resulted in The Charlesgate’s western façade extending the entire length of Charlesgate East between Beacon and Marlborough.

The September 17, 1892, edition of the American Architect and Building News noted that the property “is now being raised in height, giving about six additional suites to the hotel” and that “the additional work will be of ‘slow burning’ construction,” which the article described in detail.

In about 1908, The Charlesgate acquired 459 Marlborough which had been built in 1889 and had remained a private residence. The lot increased The Charlesgate’s frontage on Marlborough to approximately 125 feet

In about 1912, Herbert Garfield Summers became manager of The Charlesgate. He and his wife, Fanny M. (Smith) Summers, lived in the hotel.

The Putnam family continued to own The Charlesgate and J. Pickering and Grace Putnam continued to live there.

10 Charlesgate East (2014)

10 Charlesgate East (2014)

In June of 1915, Harriet Hayden filed for (and subsequently received) permission to replace a small window in the basement on the east side of 459 Marlborough under the “bay window nearest back” with “two larger windows with 16 inch brick pier between them.” The remodeling was designed by J. Pickering Putnam.

In May of 1916, Harriet Hayden filed for (and subsequently received) permission to enlarge eight basement windows on the Marlborough façade “so as to give more light in these rooms.” The remodeling was designed by J. Pickering Putnam.

J. Pickering Putnam died in February of 1917. Grace Putnam continued to live at The Charlesgate.

In about 1923, Herbert Summers acquired The Charlesgate.  Herbert G. Summers et al were the assessed owners from 1924, and Herbert Summers and Mary G. Potter are shown as the owners on the 1928 Bromley map. He continued to manage the property, and he and his wife continued to live there. He also owned the Cliff House hotel in Scituate.

Herbert Summers died in February of 1937. Fanny Summers continued to live at the hotel and their son, Richard Norman Summers, assumed management of the property. The Heirs of Herbert Summers and Mary G. Potter are shown as the owners on the 1938 Bromley map.

In mid-1947, the Charlesgate Hotel was acquired by Boston University. In its August 1, 1947, article on the transaction, the Boston Globe commented that “stepping into the Charlesgate is like stepping back into the 1890s. The small, dimly-lit lobby with its Austrian marble and flowered slipcovers, is exactly the same as when the hotel opened… ‘There never has been a bar or a cocktail lounge in the Charlesgate,’ a member of the hotel staff said proudly last night. ‘Not one drop of liquor has ever been served by the management. And we have had no big parties or balls. It is a quiet, Boston-type hotel.'”

10 Charlesgate East, Marlborough and west façades (2014)

10 Charlesgate East, Marlborough and west façades (2014)

All of the residents of The Charlesgate were required to move by September 1, 1947, among them, Grace Putnam and Fanny Summers.

In July of 1947, Boston University applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property into a dormitory for 400 female students, to be called Charlesgate Hall.

It remained a Boston University Dormitory until the early 1970s, when it was purchased from Boston University by Anthony Wine and Shirley J. Wine, trustees of the Charlesgate Realty Trust.

The property changed hands, including going through foreclosure, and in November of 1975 was acquired by Marcor Associates, Inc. Although the legal occupancy remained a dormitory, Marcor Associates operated the property as a multiple dwelling, either apartments (as it was described in the city directories) or a lodging house, retaining the name Charlesgate Hall used by Boston University.

In November of 1979, Modern Continental Enterprises purchased Charlesgate Hall from Marcor Associates. It continued to operate the property as a multiple dwelling.

In June of 1981, Emerson College purchased Charlesgate Hall from Modern Continental Enterprises. It operated the property as a dormitory.

In September of 1995, 4 Charlesgate East LLP purchased Charlesgate Hall from Emerson College. In April of 1996, 4 Charlesgate East LLC applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a dormitory into 102 apartments. It subsequently transferred the property to the Charlesgate Realty LLC.

In December of 1996, Charlesgate Realty LLC filed for (and subsequently received) permission to subdivide the property, creating one lot of approximately 12,259 sf at 4 Charlesgate East, equivalent to the original Charlesgate Hotel, with 57 units, and a second lot of approximately 7,339 sf at 10 Commonwealth, equivalent to the former houses at 10 Charlesgate East and 459 Marlborough, with 24 apartments. In January of 1998, Charlesgate Realty LLC amended its original permit to reduce the number of units at 4 Charlesgate East from 57 to 56 units.

In January of 1998, Charlesgate Realty LLC converted the two buildings into two separate condominiums: the Charlesgate Condominium at 4 Charlesgate East with 56 units, and the Barnes Mansion Condominium at 10 Charlesgate with 24 units.

459 Marlborough

459 Marlborough was designed by Rotch and Tilden, architects, and built in 1889 by Melville C. Grant, mason; John Rawson, carpenter, one of two contiguous houses (459 Marlborough and 10 Charlesgate) built at about rhe same time for Thurlow Weed Barnes and his wife, Isabel Frances (Morris) Barnes.  Isabel Morris Barnes is shown as the owner on the original building permit application for 10 Charlesgate, dated July 29, 1889, and for 459 Marlborough, dated September 16, 1889. The Barneses lived briefly at 10 Charlesgate East, but by 1892 it had been incorporated into The Charlesgate at 4 Charlesgate East.

459 Marlborough portion of 10 Charlesgate East (2014)

459 Marlborough portion of 10 Charlesgate East (2014)

By the 1890-1891 winter season, 459 Marlborough was the home of banker and broker Albion Bryant Turner and his wife, Mary Alice (Rawson) Turner. They previously had lived at 253 Commonwealth. They continued to live at 459 Marlborough during the 1890-1891 season, but moved thereafter to Newton.

459 Marlborough was not listed in the 1893 and 1894 Blue Books.

By the 1894-1895 winter season, 459 Beacon was the home of Frederic Jesup Stimson and his wife, Elizabeth Bradlee (Abbot) Stimson. They also maintained a home in Dedham, which had been their primary residence for the past few years. During the 1888-1889 winter season, they had lived at 40 Commonwealth. Elizabeth Stimson is shown as the owner of 459 Marlborough on the 1895 and 1898 Bromley maps.

Frederic Stimson was an attorney. He served as Assistant Attorney General of Massachusetts in 1884-1885 and was active in Boston politics, including running for Congress in 1902. He served as Ambassador to Argentina during the Wilson Administration. An author of several books on the law, he also wrote novels under the pen-name of “J. S. of Dale.”

During the 1895-1896 winter season, the Stimsons were traveling in Europe and 459 Marlborough was the home of Mrs. Henrietta (Jones) May, the widow of George Perrin May, who had died in September of 1895. He was a retired shipping merchant and, for the last eighteen years of his life, had served as quartermaster of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. Prior to his death they had lived at 16 Rutland, and she had resumed living there by 1897.

Elizabeth Stimson died in Venice in June of 1896. Frederic Stimson continued to live at 459 Marlborough and married again in November of 1902 to Mabel Ashhurst. After their marriage they lived at 459 Marlborough and in Dedham until the 1903-1904 winter season, after which they made Dedham their sole residence.

During the 1904-1905 winter season, 459 Marlborough was the home of Hugh Davids Scott and his wife, Helen Livingston Sanders. He was New England representative for the Philadelphia Rubber Works and the Keystone Coal and Coke Company. They previously had lived in Pennsylvania. By 1906, they had moved to Wellesley.

During the 1905-1906 winter season, 459 Marlborough was the home of Miss Mary G. Porter. She previously had lived at the Hotel Victoria at 273 Dartmouth.

During the 1906-1907 winter season, 459 Marlborough was the home of Mrs. Mary Wallingford (Herrick) Dame, the widow of Frank O. Dame, who had recently returned from travelling abroad.

Her daughter, Mrs. Gertrude Augusta (Dame) Collier, the former wife of Rev. H. Price Collier, lived with her. They also maintained a home in Brookline where they previously had lived and resumed living in 1907.

459 Marlborough was not listed in the 1908 or later Blue Books.

By 1908, 459 Marlborough had been acquired by the owners of The Charlesgate at 4-10 Charlesgate East. Horace J. Hayden is shown as the owner of both properties on the 1908 Bromley map.