362 Marlborough

362 Marlborough (2013)

362 Marlborough (2013)

Lot 24' x 112' (2,688 sf)

Lot 24′ x 112′ (2,688 sf)

362 Marlborough is located on the SE corner of Marlborough and Hereford, with 360 Marlborough to the east, 364 Marlborough to the west, across Hereford, 20 Hereford to the north, across Marlborough, and 32 Hereford to the south, across Alley 428.

362 Marlborough was built in 1879-1880 for building contractor George Wheatland, Jr., one of eight contiguous houses (348-350-352-354-356-358-360-362 Marlborough) built in 1878-1880 for him.

The land on which 348-362 Marlborough were built was acquired by George Wheatland, Jr., on May 10, 1872, from a real estate investment trust formed by Grenville Temple Winthrop Braman, Henry Dwight Hyde, and Henry Melville Whitney. It was part of one of several parcels they had purchased on March 1, 1872, from the Boston Water Power Company, of which Grenville Braman was treasurer.

On May 25, 1872, George Wheatland entered into a trust agreement with William Dudley Pickman and William Pickering Fay under which he agreed to hold two undivided one-third interests in the property in their names and they agreed to assume the obligation for one third (each) of the mortgages on the property. On April 18, 1876, George Wheatland, Jr., sold the remaining one-third interest in the property to his father, George Wheatland, Sr., of Salem.

Click here for an index to the deeds for 362 Marlborough.

George Wheatland, Jr., subdivided the property into eight lots, seven with 23 foot frontages and the eighth, at the corner of Hereford, with a 24 foot frontage. He built houses on the lots at 348-362 Marlborough, each of the same design, with the entrance on the left and a bay on the right.

The houses probably were designed by architect Obed F. Smith. No architect is indicated on the permit applications. However, the final building inspection report for 354-356 Marlborough indicates that the architect was “F. O. Smith.” There was no architect named Smith with those initials listed in the 1878-1880 Boston Directories and it appears likely it was meant to be O. F. Smith. Obed F. Smith designed a number of houses for George Wheatland, Jr., at this time, including six houses (381-391 Marlborough) of very similar design.

348-362 Marlborough all were started in 1878 or 1879 and appear to have been completed within a year. From the deeds and original permit applications, it appears that 348-350-352 Marlborough were built first, then 354-356 Marlborough, and then 358-360-362 Marlborough. The lots were transferred to one of the three owners of the land as the houses were constructed; each house was then sold after it was completed.

The original permit application for 362 Marlborough is not included in the Building Department’s files. However, based on the deeds for the house, it appears that it was built at the same time as 358-360 Marlborough, the permit application for which was filed on September 22, 1879, by George Wheatland, Jr.  On May 1, 1880, when the houses were nearing completion, William D. Pickman and the estate of William P. Fay (who had died in March of 1879) transferred their two-thirds interest in 358-360-362 Marlborough to George Wheatland, Sr.

On June 28, 1880, 362 Marlborough was purchased from George Wheatland, Sr., by Catherine (Kate) Bigelow (Allen) Winship, the wife of John Perkins Cushing Winship. They previously had lived at the Hotel Cluny at 543 (formerly 233) Boylston.

J. P. Cushing Winship was a notary public and marine insurance adjuster.  He also served as secretary of the Brighton Public Library, and was the author of a history of Brighton.  His father, Jonathan Winship, founded the Winship nurseries in Brighton.

The Winships continued to live at 362 Marlborough during the 1882-1883 winter season, but moved thereafter and by 1884 were living at the Hotel Oxford (southeast corner of Exeter and Huntington). By 1886, they were living in Brighton.

362 Marlborough (2013)

362 Marlborough (2013)

On April 38, 1883, 362 Marlborough was acquired from Kate Winship by James Bartlett Billings. He and his wife, Maria (Braman) Billings, made it their home. They previously had lived at the Coolidge House hotel in Bowdoin Square (they may have moved to 362 Marlborough as early as 1882; the Winships are listed there in the 1881-1883 Blue Books, but only in the 1881 City Directory; the Billingses are listed at there in the Blue Books from 1884, but were listed there in the City Directories from 1882).

James Billings was a boot and shoe dealer with factories in Marlborough, Massachusetts.  He also was an early shareholder in the Boston Base Ball Association, formed in 1871 and affiliated with the National Association (later the National League).  In 1877, the franchise was sold to Arthur Henry Soden, a roofing materials dealer.  Arthur Soden became president, James Billings was named treasurer, and William Conant was named secretary.  Known as the “triumvirate,” they operated the team for the next thirty years.  The team had first been called the Red Stockings and then the Red Caps, and in 1883 became the Beaneaters.  James Billings retired as treasurer in 1904 and Arthur Soden sold the franchise in 1907.  After several more name changes, the team became the Boston Braves in 1911.

James and Maria Billings’ son, George Bartlett Billings, lived with them.  He was associated with his father’s business, and later would become US Commissioner of Immigration in Boston.  He married in November of 1892 to Helen Agnes McDonough.  After their marriage, they lived with his parents at 362 Marlborough.

In March of 1894, James Billings’s business failed and 362 Marlborough became the property of his business associate, Arthur Soden. The deed transferring the property was dated June 29, 1873, but not recorded until March 7, 1894. Arthur Soden and his wife, Mary Elizabeth (Simpson) Soden, lived in Newton.

James and Maria Billings and George and Helen Billings continued to live at 362 Marlborough during the 1896-1897 winter season, but moved thereafter, James and Maria Billings to the Hotel Touraine (southeast corner of Boylston and Tremont) and George and Helen Billings to Jamaica Plain.

On July 1, 1897, 362 Marlborough was acquired from Arthur Soden by Ernestine Arzilla (Houghton) Payne, the wife of Dr. John Howard Payne, a physician and oculist. They lived at the Hotel Nottingham at 25 Huntington in 1897, and had moved to an apartment at The Belvoir at 636-638 Beacon by 1898.

On July 28, 1897, 362 Marlborough was acquired from Ernestine Payne by Francis Alonzo Peters, a broker. He and his wife, Mary Elizabeth (Austin) Peters, made it their home. They previously had lived at 541 Commonwealth.

Francis Peters died in June of 1911. Mary Peters continued to live at 362 Marlborough during the 1911-1912 winter season, but moved thereafter to 61 Mt. Vernon.

On December 13, 1911, 362 Marlborough was purchased from the estate of Francis Peters by Edmund Quincy Sylvester.

Edmund Q. Sylvester was an architect noted for his ecclesiastical work. He maintained his office in Boston but lived in Hanover. He was unmarried.

Architectural rendering of proposed front and rear elevations of 362 Marlborough (1912), by architect Edmund Q. Sylvester; courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department, City of Boston Blueprints Collection

Architectural rendering of proposed front and rear elevations of 362 Marlborough (1912), by architect Edmund Q. Sylvester; courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department, City of Boston Blueprints Collection

In the spring of 1912, Edmund Sylvester remodeled 362 Marlborough to add a fifth story and rear ell, and modify the entrance and oriel window on the Hereford façade. His plans for the remodeling – including floor plans and elevations – are included in the City of Boston Blueprints Collection in the Boston Public Library’s Arts Department (reference BIN A-111).

Architectural rendering of proposed Hereford Street elevation of 362 Marlborough (1912), by architect Edmund Q. Sylvester; courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department, City of Boston Blueprints Collection

Architectural rendering of proposed Hereford Street elevation of 362 Marlborough (1912), by architect Edmund Q. Sylvester; courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department, City of Boston Blueprints Collection

By the 1913-1914 winter season, 362 Marlborough was the home of Edmund Sylvester’s brother-in-law and sister, Dr. Hugh Kerr Hatfield and Eliza Salmond (Sylvester) Harraden Hatfield. They had lived at 410 Beacon in 1912.  They also maintained a home in Hanover.

Hugh Hatfield was an physician and orthodontist.  He maintained his offices at 129 Marlborough until about 1941, when he moved to 282 Berkeley (29 Commonwealth).

Edmund Sylvester continued to maintain his office in Boston and reside in Hanover, but probably also lived at 362 Marlborough with the Hatfields when he was in Boston. From about 1920, he appears to have more regularly spent the winter seasons at 362 Marlborough; however, Hanover remained his primary residence.

Eliza Hatfield died in January of 1942 and Edmund Quincy Sylvester died in September of 1942.  Thereafter, Hugh Hatfield made Hanover his year-round home.

362 Marlborough was shown as vacant in the 1943 City Directory.

On March 16, 1943, 362 Marlborough was purchased from Edmund Sylvester’s estate by William J. O’Callaghan. He was unmarried and lived there with his unmarried brother and sister, Jeremiah J. O’Callaghan and Jane (Jennie) O’Callaghan. William O’Callaghan previously had lived in Milton, and Jennie and Jeremiah O’Callaghan had lived in West Roxbury.

Jennie O’Callaghan was president of Hickson & Company, a women’s clothier located on Boylston.  William O’Callaghan was manager of the firm.  Jeremiah O’Callaghan operated a dog kennel.

William O’Callaghan died in October of 1943. Jennie O’Callaghan and Jeremiah O’Callaghan continued to live at 362 Marlborough, and on January 19, 1948, it was acquired by Jennie O’Callaghan from the other members of the O’Callaghan family who had inherited partial interests in it from William O’Callaghan.

By 1950, 362 Marlborough had been divided into two apartments. Arthur B. Bell, an engineer, lived in the second apartment from 1950 through about 1962.

On July 20, 1962, 362 Marlborough was acquired from Jennie O’Callaghan by Shirley Clifford Speed, a real estate dealer who converted many Back Bay houses into lodging houses and apartments.

On July 20, 1962, 362 Marlborough was acquired from S. Clifford Speed by Arthur J. Salisbury and Norman W. Andrew, trustees of the ANSA Trust, who lived in one of the apartments. Arthur J. Salisbury was a public health officer with the state Department of Health, and Norman W. Andrew was an anesthesiologist at Boston City Hospital. By 1966, Norman Andrew had moved to 52 Fayette. Arthur Salisbury continued to live at 362 Marlborough until about 1968.

362 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

362 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

The other apartment was the home of Kurt Esser, a tax attorney with the Gillette Company, and his wife, Myrna (Steinowitz) Esser.  By 1966, they had moved to 230 Marlborough, and their former apartment at 362 Marlborough was the home of Jules Eskin and his wife, Virginia Eskin.  Jules Eskin was principal cellist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra; Virginia Eskin was a concert pianist who would become a leading exponent of works by women composers.

The Eskins continued to live there in 1967, but moved thereafter and by 1968 their apartment had become the home of Evan Geilich, a tanning company executive, and his wife, Käthe (Andress) Geilich.

On December 30, 1968, Arthur Salisbury and Norman Andrew sold a 60 percent undivided interest in 362 Marlborough to Leonard Coppelman and his wife, Lillian Coppelman, and a 40 percent undivided interest to Evan and Käthe (Andress) Geilich.

On May 30, 1975, Barbara A. Taubenhaus purchased the Coppelmans’ 60 percent interest in the house.

The Geiliches separated and on May 14, 1980, Evan Geilich transferred his interest in 362 Marlborough to Käthe (Andress) Geilich, who resumed her unmarried name of Käthe Andress and continued to live at 362 Marlborough.

On May 17, 2005, Barbara Taubenhaus filed a Notice of Petition to Partition in Land Court, seeking to establish separate ownership of her 60 percent of the house so that her 60 percent interest in the property could be sold separately.

Barbara Taubenhaus died in July of 2007, and on September 4, 2007, her 60 percent interest in the property was inherited by Thomas V. Alpern.

On May 13, 2008, Thomas Alpern and Käthe Andress subdivided 362 Marlborough into two condominium units, the 362 Marlborough Street Condominium.

On November 13, 2015, both condominiums were purchased by the Lake Marlborough 362 Nominee Trust (Anastasios Parafestas, trustee).  In June of 2015, the Lake Marlborough Nominee Trust had purchased 352 Marlborough.  The trusts were formed for the benefit of Stephen Pagliuca and his wife, Judy Pagliuca.  At the time of the purchase, Stephen Pagliuca was managing partner of Bain Capital and co-owner of the Boston Celtics basketball franchise.  They also maintained a home in Weston.

In 2016, the Pagliucas applied for (and subsequently received) permission to remodel 362 Marlborough into a single-family dwelling, including expanding the rear ell added in 1912 into a garage.