428 Marlborough

428 Marlborough

428 Marlborough (2014)

Irregular Lot: 25' on Marlborough (1,755 sf)

Irregular Lot: 25′ on Marlborough (1,755 sf)

428 Marlborough is located on the south side of Marlborough, between Massachusetts Avenue and Charlesgate East, with 426 Marlborough to the east and 430 Marlborough to the west, across Alley 905.

428 Marlborough was designed by Cummings and Sears, architect, and built in 1886 by Thomas Lyon, mason, for merchandise and food broker Albert Henry Morse and his wife, Ella Josephine (Frost) Morse. They previously had lived at 26 Concord Square. He is shown as the owner of 428 Marlborough on the original building permit application, dated May 28, 1886. Ella Morse is shown as the owner on the 1888, 1898, 1908, and 1912 Bromley maps.

The Morses’ son, Albert Henry Morse, Jr., lived with them. He was associated with his father’s merchandise brokerage firm. He married in July of 1897 to Ada C. Burke. After their marriage, they lived at 428 Marlborough with his parents.

Albert Morse, Sr., died in February of 1905. Ella Morse and Albert and Ada Morse continued to live at 428 Marlborough. Albert Morse is shown as the owner on the 1917, 1928, and 1938 Bromley maps.

Ella Morse died in 1919.  Albert and Ada Morse continued to live at 428 Marlborough during the 1930-1931 winter season, after which they moved to an apartment at 360 Beacon. They also maintained a home in Manchester.

428 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

428 Marlborough (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

428 Marlborough was shown as vacant in the 1932-1939 City Directories.

By 1939, 428 Marlborough was owned by Warren-Stevens Inc.

In mid-1939, 428 Marlborough was acquired by Mrs. Mabel F. (Morgan) Reynolds, the former wife of Robert Burns Reynolds. The transaction was reported in the Boston Globe on July 16, 1939.  She was the assessed owner from 1940 through 1943.  Her mother, Ida M. (Jackson) Morgan Christenberry, the former wife of Harry Morgan and of William Oscar Christenberry, lived with her. They previously had lived at 638 Beacon, and prior to that at 362 Commonwealth in 1935 and at 8 Commonwealth in 1934.

In January of 1940, Mabel Reynolds applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert 428 Marlborough into a lodging house.

From 1944, Ida Christenberry, trustee, was listed as the assessed owner of 428 Marlborough.

Mabel Reynolds and Ida Christenberry continued to live at 428 Marlborough until about 1947.

By 1947, 428 Marlborough was owned by Robert Winston Taylor and his wife, Edna Beatrice (Walls) Taylor. They lived at 169 Commonwealth.

428 Marlborough continued to be a lodging house.

By mid-1950, Northeastern University had acquired 428 Marlborough from Robert and Edna Taylor. In June of 1950, Northeastern announced plans to convert the property into a dormitory for women, the first dormitory owned and operated by the University. It continued to operate the dormitory at 428 Marlborough until about 1962.

By mid-1962, 428 Marlborough was owned by realtor John J. Ventola. He operated it as a lodging house.

In October of 1964, John Ventola’s Van Realty Corporation filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property into nine apartments.

428 Marlborough changed hands and was purchased in September of 1985 by Meryl Charnow, trustee of the Ludnow Realty Trust. In January of 1986, he converted the property into nine condominium units, the 428 Marlborough Street Condominium.

In October of 2000, Theodore Hoppe, owner of two of the units, applied for (and subsequently received) permission to combine them into one unit, and in June of 2002, he applied for (and subsequently received) permission to combine his expanded unit with a third unit. That same month, the condominium association amended the master deed to reduce the number of units from nine to seven, reflecting the combined units.

424-436 Marlborough, with 416 Marlborough in the distance (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

424-436 Marlborough, with 416 Marlborough in the distance (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership