6 Gloucester

6 Gloucester (2013)

6 Gloucester (2013)

Lot 18.01' x 70' (1,261 sf)

Lot 18.01′ x 70′ (1,261 sf)

6 Gloucester is located on the west side of Gloucester, between Beacon and Marlborough, with 4 Gloucester to the north and 8 Gloucester to the south.

6 Gloucester was built ca. 1871, one of three contiguous houses (4-6-8 Gloucester) built for investment banker Henry Chapman Wainwright for speculative sale.

Henry C. Wainwright purchased the land for 4-6-8 Gloucester on May 23, 1871, from George Williams Pratt, an investment banker and stockbroker and one of the founders of the Boston Stock Exchange. He and his wife, Mary Barrow (White) Pratt, lived at 13 Louisburg Square. They also maintained a home, Oakley, on Belmont Avenue in Watertown (it became the Oakley Country Club in 1898). The land for 4-6-8 Gloucester originally was part of a larger parcel purchased from the Boston Water Power Company on February 20, 1863, by George Pratt’s son, Robert Marion Pratt, also a banker and broker.

Click here for an index to the deeds for 6 Gloucester.

When he sold the completed houses, Henry C. Wainwright included in the deeds a four foot wide easement across the rear of 4-6 Gloucester to provide access to the alley for 4-6 Gloucester and drainage to the alley for 4-6-8 Gloucester.

On March 1, 1872, 6 Gloucester was purchased from Henry C. Wainwright by Charles McBurney, president of the Boston Elastic Fabric Company. He and his wife, Rosina (Horton) McBurney, lived at 98 Boylston.

In 1876, Charles McBurney declared bankruptcy. On August 10, 1876, Josiah Gooding foreclosed on a mortgage from Charles McBurney and sold the property to Theodore P. Gooding, and on October 27, the Provident Institution for Savings in the Town of Boston foreclosed on its mortgage to Charles McBurney (which had been assumed by Theodore Gooding), and took possession of the property.

6 Gloucester was not listed in the 1876 and 1877 Blue Books.

On January 17, 1877, 6 Gloucester was acquired by merchant Frederick Hall Bradlee. He and his wife, Lucretia (Wainwright) Bradlee, lived at 13 Commonwealth. Lucretia Bradlee was the aunt of William Chapman Wainwright, for whom 4-6-8 Gloucester were built.

By the 1877-1878 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of the Bradlees’ son-in-law and daughter, Frederic Stone and Lucy Hall (Bradlee) Stone. They previously had lived at the LaGrange House hotel at 218 Tremont.

Frederic Stone was a broker and commission merchant in the China trade.

The Stones continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1886-1887 season, but moved thereafter to 13 Commonwealth to live with her widowed father (her mother died in October of 1886).

On June 25, 1887, 6 Gloucester was purchased from Frederick Bradlee by Richard Manning Hodges, a physician and professor of surgery at Harvard, He and his wife, Frances Gardner (White) Hodges, lived at 408 Beacon.

By the 1887-1888 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of the Hodgeses’ son and daughter-in-law, Dr. William Donnison Hodges, a physician, and Isabel Mary (Struthers) Hodges. They had married in June of 1887, and 6 Gloucester was their first home together. They also maintained a home in Nahant.

William Hodges died in March of 1893 and Isabel Hodges moved soon thereafter.

6 Gloucester (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

On May 2, 1893, 6 Gloucester was purchased from Richard M. Hodges by Charles Anthony Morss, Jr. He and his wife, Martha Houghton (Reed) Morss, made it their home. They had married that month and 6 Gloucester was their first home together. Prior to their marriage, he had lived at 323 Marlborough with his parents, Charles and Mary (Wells) Morss, and she had lived at 3 Gloucester with her parents, James Henry Reed and Martha Ann (Wesson) Reed.

Charles Morss, Jr., was treasurer of his father’s wire and cable manufacturing firm and later would become a governor of the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston.

On May 22, 1895, Charles Morss transferred 6 Gloucester into his wife’s name.

In about 1897, Charles and Martha Morss were joined briefly at 6 Gloucester by her brother, James Henry Reed, Jr. He previously had lived at 3 Gloucester with their parents, both of whom died in 1896. By 1898, he had moved to Brookline.

Charles and Martha Morss continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1897-1898 winter season, but moved thereafter to Chestnut Hill.

The house was not listed in the 1899 Blue Book.

On May 19, 1899, 6 Gloucester was purchased from Martha Morss by Susan S. (Cox) Wainwright, the wife of Wilton Prescott Wainwright. They previously had lived at 121 Newbury. Wilton Wainwright does not appear to have been closely related to William Chapman Wainwright, for whom 4-6-8 Gloucester were built.

Wilton Wainwright was a banker and stockbroker in partnership with his brother, James H. Wainwright. James Wainwright withdrew from Wainwright Brothers in the fall of 1901, and the firm failed in December of 1901. Frank M. Copeland was named assignee in bankruptcy.

Wilton and Susan Wainwright lived at 6 Gloucester during the 1901-1902 winter seasaon, but moved thereafter.

During the 1902-1903 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of cotton broker John Arthur Brooks and his wife, Mary Ten Eyck (Oakley) Brooks.  They had married in April of 1902, and 6 Gloucester probably was their first home together.  By the 1903-1904 season, they had moved to 10 Fairfield.

By the 1903-1904 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home Dr. Percy Musgrave, a physician, and his wife, Edith Elise (Porter) Musgrave.  He also maintained his medical offices there.  They previously had lived at the Hotel Royal at 295-297 Beacon.

On January 17, 1906, 6 Gloucester was acquired from Susan Wainwright by Frank M. Copeland.

The Musgraves continued to live there during the 1906-1907 season, but moved thereafter to 325 Beacon.

During the 1907-1908 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Mrs. Frances Duer (Jones) Key, the former wife of John James Key, and their two daughters, Jean Frances Duer Key and Katherine Voorhis Key.   They moved to 402 Marlborough by the next season.

The house was not listed in the 1909-1911 Blue Books.

On January 15, 1910, 6 Gloucester was acquired from Frank Copeland by Miss Mary Elizabeth Church, who operated a girls’ finishing school at 401 Beacon, where Miss Church also lived. She used 6 Gloucester as an annex to her school. A 1915 directory of private schools noted that “Miss Church is an Episcopalian and all resident pupils are expected to attend Trinity Church.”

On January 25, 1912, 6 Gloucester was purchased from Mary E. Church by Frederick Lewis Dabney, trustee of the Gloucester Trust. On the same day, he also acquired 8 Gloucester, which the Gloucester Trust subsequently razed and replaced with a seven-unit apartment building.

Frederick Lewis Dabney was a stockbroker. He and his wife, Elizabeth Elliot (Fay) Dabney, lived at 298 Beacon.

Miss Church continued to operate her school at 6 Gloucester (and at 401 Beacon) until about 1919.

6 Gloucester was not listed in the 1920 Blue Book.

By the 1920-1921 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Ezra Henry Baker, a widower, and his daughter, Gertrude.  They previously had lived at 88 Commonwealth with his mother-in-law, Emma Frances (Pierce) Keyes, the widow of Henry Keyes.

Ezra Henry Baker was an investment banker. He was the first chairman of the Boston Licensing Board, serving from 1906 to 1912, and later was treasurer of Radcliffe College.

Entrance to 6 Gloucester (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1922-1923 season, but moved thereafter to 294 Marlborough (they had lived there before, prior to the death of Ezra Baker’s wife, Martha (Keyes) Baker, in June of 1896).

By the 1923-1924 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Charles Ward Cheney and his wife, Sylvia Burt (Howell) Cheney.  He was assistant treasurer of a concrete construction firm.  They previously had lived in South America, where he represented the United States Steel Products Company.  They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1924-1925 season, after which they moved to Concord.

By the 1925-1926 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Louis Trask Hawkins and his wife, Florence E. (Doten) Hawkins.  They previously had lived at 158 Bay State Road.

Louis Hawkins was a wholesale meat dealer.

They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1926-1927 season, after which they moved to an apartment at 250 Beacon.

On April 1, 1927, 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester were acquired from the Gloucester Trust by Abbott Lawrence Lowell, president of Harvard University. He and his wife, Anna Parker (Lowell) Lowell, lived in Cambridge.

By the 1927-1928 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Joseph Patrick Walsh, an attorney specializing in criminal law, and his wife, Catherine Loretta (Ruhen) Walsh.  They previously had lived at 42 Fairfield.  They also maintained a home in Plymouth.  They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1934-1935 season, after which they moved to the Hotel Brunswick (southeast corner of Clarendon and Boylston).  He died in December of 1935.

6 Gloucester was not listed in the 1936 and 1937 Blue Books, nor in the 1936-1938 Lists of Residents, and was shown as vacant in the 1936-1939 City Directories.

By 1938, 6 Gloucester had been converted into a lodging house, with 13 residents listed there in the 1939 List of Residents.

A. Lawrence Lowell died in January of 1943. He and Anna Lowell (who had died in March of 1930) had no children, and 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester were inherited by his six nieces and nephews: Elfrida (Roosevelt) Clarke, the wife of Orme Bigland Clarke, and Katharine Lowell (Roosevelt) Reeve, the wife of J. Stanley Reeve, the children of Katharine (Lowell) Roosevelt and Alfred Roosevelt; and George Lowell Putnam, Katharine Lawrence (Putnam) Bundy, the wife of Harvey Hollister Bundy, Roger Lowell Putnam, and Augustus Lowell Putnam, the children of William Lowell Putnam and Elizabeth (Lowell) Putnam.

On February 28, 1944, they transferred the property to Caleb Loring and George Putnam as trustees on their behalf.

On May 1, 1945, 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester were acquired by Mildred Elizabeth (called Elizabeth) (McKenzie) Hollander, the wife of Charles Michael Hollander. They lived in an apartment at 86 Commonwealth and moved to an apartment at 8 Gloucester after acquiring the building. He had been a furrier and was a wine importer and retailer, president of the firm Charles L. Richardson & Co.

On January 22, 1946, 6 Gloucester was acquired from Elizabeth Hollander by Ethel M. (Crowell) Lowd, the widow of Arley A. Lowd. She previously had lived at 86 Marlborough. She lived briefly at 6 Gloucester and then moved to 291 Beacon.

The Hollanders retained 8 Gloucester and in the deed selling 6 Gloucester, they included several stipulations for the benefit of their building, including language limiting 6 Gloucester to its current height, providing an easement permitting the maintenance of windows at 8 Gloucester overlooking 6 Gloucester, and specifying that 6 Gloucester could only be used for dwelling house purposes.

On February 19, 1946, 6 Gloucester was acquired from Ethel Lowd by Daniel M. Sullivan, a sales supervisor, and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Sullivan, a nurse, who operated it as a lodging house. They previously had lived in an apartment at 391 Beacon. They continued to live at 6 Gloucester until about 1954.

On December 12, 1955, 6 Gloucester was acquired from the Sullivans by Hilma E. Olson, who operated it as a lodging house. She was a nurse and previously had lived in Quincy.

The property changed hands, remaining a lodging house in the 1970s, and on December 19, 1977, was purchased by Neal Gold and Irvin H. Kooris, trustees of the 6 Gloucester Street Trust.

In November of 1977, prior to taking title to the property, they had filed for (and subsequently received) permission to repair fire damage to the property and to legalize its occupancy as four apartments (there being no Building Department record of the legal occupancy).

On July 21, 1978, they converted the property into four condominium units, the 6 Gloucester Street Condominium.