6 Gloucester

6 Gloucester (2013)

6 Gloucester (2013)

Lot 18.01' x 70' (1,261 sf)

Lot 18.01′ x 70′ (1,261 sf)

6 Gloucester is located on the west side of Gloucester, between Beacon and Marlborough, with 4 Gloucester to the north and 8 Gloucester to the south.

6 Gloucester was built ca. 1871 for investment banker Henry Chapman Wainwright, one of three contiguous houses (4-6-8 Gloucester), probably for speculative sale.

Charles McBurney is shown as the owner of 6 Gloucester on the 1874 Hopkins map.  He was president of the Boston Elastic Fabric Company and lived at 98 Boylston.

6 Gloucester was not listed in the 1876 and 1877 Blue Books.

By the 1877-1878 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Frederic Stone and his wife, Lucy Hall (Bradlee) Stone.  They previously had lived at the LaGrange House hotel at 218 Tremont.  Frederick Hall Bradlee, Lucy Stone’s father, is shown as the owner of 6 Gloucester on the 1883 Bromley map; her mother, Lucretia (Wainwright) Bradlee, was the aunt of Henry Chapman Wainwright, for whom 6 Gloucester had been built.

Frederic Stone was a broker and commission merchant in the China trade.

They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1886-1887 season, but moved thereafter to 13 Commonwealth to live with her widowed father (her mother died in October of 1886).

By the 1887-1888 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Dr. William Donnison Hodges, a physician, and his wife, Isabel Mary (Struthers) Hodges.  They had married in June of 1887, and 6 Gloucester probably was their first home together.  His father, Richard Manning Hodges, is shown as the owner on the 1888 and 1890 Bromley maps.  They continued to live there until William Hodges’s death in March of 1893.

By the 1893-1894 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Charles Anthony Morss, Jr., and his wife, Martha Houghton (Reed) Morss. They had been married in May of 1893, and 6 Gloucester probably was their first home together. Prior to their marriage, he had lived at 323 Marlborough with his parents, Charles and Mary (Wells) Morss.  Charles Morss, Jr., is shown as the owner of 6 Gloucester on the 1895 Bromley map, and Martha Morss is shown as the owner on the 1898 map.

Charles Morss, Jr., was treasurer of his father’s wire and cable manufacturing firm and later would become a governor of the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston.

They continued to live there in 1898, but had moved to Chestnut Hill by 1899.

The house was not listed in the 1899 Blue Book.

By the 1899-1900 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of banker and stockbroker Wilton Prescott Wainwright and his wife Susan S. (Cox) Wainwright.  They previously had lived at 121 Newbury.  His brokerage firm, Wainwright Brothers, failed in December of 1901, and they moved from 6 Gloucester soon thereafter.

During the 1902-1903 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of cotton broker John Arthur Brooks and his wife, Mary Ten Eyck (Oakley) Brooks.  They had been married in April of 1902, and 6 Gloucester probably was their first home together.  By the 1903-1904 season, they had moved to 10 Fairfield.

By the 1903-1904 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home Dr. Percy Musgrave, a physician, and his wife Edith Elise (Porter) Musgrave.  He also maintained his medical offices there.  They previously had lived at the Hotel Royal at 295-297 Beacon.

They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1906-1907 season, but moved thereafter to 325 Beacon.

Frank M. Copeland is shown as the owner of 6 Gloucester on the 1908 Bromley map.

During the 1907-1908 winter season, it was the home of Mrs. Frances Duer (Jones) Key, the former wife of John James Key, and their two daughters, Jean Frances Duer Key and Katherine Voorhis Key.   They moved to 402 Marlborough by the next season.

The house was not listed in the 1909-1911 Blue Books.

By 1912, 6 Gloucester was owned by Frederick Lewis Dabney.  He also owned 8 Gloucester, a 7-unit apartment building built in 1912.  He is shown as the owner of both properties on the 1912 and 1917 Bromley maps.

From about 1912, 6 Gloucester was Miss Church’s School, a girls’ finishing school operated by Miss Mary Elizabeth Church.  The school’s primary location was at 401 Beacon, where Miss Church also lived.  A 1915 directory of private schools noted that “Miss Church is an Episcopalian and all resident pupils are expected to attend Trinity Church.”

The school continued to be located at 6 Gloucester until about 1919.

6 Gloucester was not listed in the 1920 Blue Book.

By the 1920-1921 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Ezra Henry Baker, a widower, and his daughter, Gertrude.  They previously had lived at 88 Commonwealth with his mother-in-law, Mrs. Emma Frances (Pierce) Keyes, the widow of Henry Keyes.

Ezra Henry Baker was an investment banker. He was the first chairman of the Boston Licensing Board, serving from 1906 to 1912, and later was treasurer of Radcliffe College.

They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1922-1923 season, but moved thereafter to 294 Marlborough (they had lived there before, prior to the death of Ezra Baker’s wife, Martha (Keyes) Baker, in June of 1896).

By the 1923-1924 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Charles Ward Cheney and his wife, Sylvia Burt (Howell) Cheney.  He was assistant treasurer of a concrete construction firm.  They previously had lived in South America, where he represented the United States Steel Products Company.  They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1924-1925 season, after which they moved to Concord.

By the 1925-1926 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Louis Trask Hawkins and his wife, Florence E. (Doten) Hawkins.  They previously had lived at 158 Bay State Road.

Louis Hawkins was a wholesale meat dealer.

They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1926-1927 season, after which they moved to an apartment at 250 Beacon.

A. Lawrence Lowell is shown as the owner of 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester on the 1928 Bromley map.

By the 1927-1928 winter season, 6 Gloucester was the home of Joseph Patrick Walsh, an attorney specializing in criminal law, and his wife, Catherine Loretta (Ruhen) Walsh.  They previously had lived at 42 Fairfield.  They also maintained a home in Plymouth.  They continued to live at 6 Gloucester during the 1934-1935 season, after which they moved to the Hotel Brunswick (southeast corner of Clarendon and Boylston).  He died in December of 1935..

6 Gloucester was not listed in the 1936 and 1937 Blue Books and was shown as vacant in the 1936-1939 City Directories.

A. Lawrence Lowell continued to be shown as the owner of 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester on the 1938 Bromley map.

In November of 1938, the Building Department issued a violation citation indicating that the property had been illegally converted into three apartments.  In January of 1939, it indicated that the “cause for complaint” had been removed.

By 1940, 6 Gloucester had been converted into a lodging house.

In 1946, 6 Gloucester was acquired by Daniel M. Sullivan, a sales supervisor, and his wife, Mary E. Sullivan, a nurse, who operated it as a lodging house.  Daniel M. Sullivan et al were the assessed owners from 1947.  They previously had lived in an apartment at 391 Beacon.  They continued to live at 6 Gloucester until about 1954.

The property changed hands and in December of 1977 was purchased by Neal Gold and Irvin H. Kooris, trustees of 6 Gloucester Street Trust.

In November of 1977, prior to finalizing their purchase of the property, they had filed for (and subsequently received) permission to repair fire damage to the property and to legalize its occupancy as four apartments (there being no Building Department record of the legal occupancy).  In July of 1978, they converted the property into four condominium units, the 6 Gloucester Street Condominium.