8 Gloucester

8 Gloucester (2013)

Lot 57.99' x 70' (4,059 sf)

Lot 57.99′ x 70′ (4,059 sf)

8 Gloucester is located on the NW corner of Gloucester and Marlborough, with 6 Gloucester to the north, 334 Marlborough to the south, across Marlborough, 7 Gloucester to the east, across Gloucester, and 337 Marlborough to the west.

8 Gloucester was designed by Parker, Thomas, and Rice, architects, and built in 1912 for the Gloucester Trust.  It was built as a 7-unit apartment building, The Gloucester, replacing a house built ca. 1871.

Plans for the building — including elevations, floor plans, and framing plans — are included in the City of Boston Blueprints Collection in the Boston Public Library’s Arts Department (reference BIN A-75).

Frederick Lewis Dabney, trustee of the Gloucester Trust, purchased 8 Gloucester on January 25, 1912. He purchased 6 Gloucester on the same day. He subsequently demolished 8 Gloucester and had the new apartment house built on its site.

Click here for an index to the deeds for 8 Gloucester.

Frederick Lewis Dabney was a stockbroker. He and his wife, Elizabeth Elliot (Fay) Dabney, lived at 298 Beacon.

The Gloucester had been completed and occupied by the 1912-1913 winter season.

8 Gloucester (1912), from The Executed Works of Parker, Thomas, and Rice

8 Gloucester (1912), from Executed Works of Parker, Thomas, and Rice, courtesy of Tudy Bartlett

Frederick Dabney died in November of 1920 and real estate dealer Richard DeBlois Boardman subsequently became trustee of the Gloucester Trust.

On April 1, 1927, 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester were acquired from the Gloucester Trust by Abbott Lawrence Lowell, president of Harvard University. He and his wife, Anna Parker (Lowell) Lowell, lived in Cambridge.

A. Lawrence Lowell died in January of 1943. He and Anna Lowell (who had died in March of 1930) had no children, and 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester were inherited by his six nieces and nephews: Elfrida (Roosevelt) Clarke, the wife of Orme Bigland Clarke, and Katharine Lowell (Roosevelt) Reeve, the wife of J. Stanley Reeve, the children of Katharine (Lowell) Roosevelt and Alfred Roosevelt; and George Lowell Putnam, Katharine Lawrence (Putnam) Bundy, the wife of Harvey Hollister Bundy, Roger Lowell Putnam, and Augustus Lowell Putnam, the children of William Lowell Putnam and Elizabeth (Lowell) Putnam.

On February 28, 1944, they transferred the property to Caleb Loring and George Putnam as trustees on their behalf.

On May 1, 1945, 6 Gloucester and 8 Gloucester were acquired by Mildred Elizabeth (called Elizabeth) (McKenzie) Hollander, the wife of Charles Michael Hollander. They lived in an apartment at 86 Commonwealth and moved to an apartment at 8 Gloucester after acquiring the building. He had been a furrier and was a wine importer and retailer, president of the firm Charles L. Richardson & Co.

In January of 1946, Elizabeth Hollander sold 6 Gloucester to Ethel M. (Crowell) Lowd, the widow of Arley A. Lowd.

Architectural rendering of the Gloucester Street elevation of 8 Gloucester, by architects Parker, Thomas, and Rice; courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department, City of Boston Blueprints Collection

Architectural rendering of the Gloucester Street elevation of 8 Gloucester, by architects Parker, Thomas, and Rice; courtesy of the Boston Public Library Arts Department, City of Boston Blueprints Collection

The Hollanders retained 8 Gloucester and in the deed selling 6 Gloucester, they included several stipulations for the benefit of their building, including language limiting 6 Gloucester to its current height, providing an easement permitting the maintenance of windows at 8 Gloucester overlooking 6 Gloucester, and specifying that 6 Gloucester could only be used for dwelling house purposes.firm Charles L. Richardson & Co.

The Hollanders continued to live at 8 Gloucester until the mid-1950s.

On December 22, 1955, 8 Gloucester was acquired from Elizabeth Hollander by real estate dealer Thomas J. Diab. In March of 1957, he filed for (and subsequently received) permission to legalize the occupancy as nine apartments, which he indicated was the occupancy when he acquired the building, stating that the building “shows every evidence of having been used as such for at least the past ten years.”

The property subsequently changed hands and on April 2, 1962, was acquired by the Lister Realty Corporation (Samuel Stearns, president, and Norman Lipson, treasurer). In May of 1962, it filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property into 17 apartments.

On August 1, 1963, 8 Gloucester was acquired from the Lister Realty Corporation by Jack Eadie Molesworth.  Jack E. Molesworth was a philatelic dealer specializing in Confederate stamps.  A leader of the ultra-conservative Young Americans for Freedom and a Republican State Committee member, he was an unsuccessful candidate for Congress in 1964.  He and his wife, Phyllis (Carpinteri) Molesworth, lived in an apartment at 166 Beacon in the early 1960s, but had moved to an apartment at 88 Beacon by 1964.

On August 23, 1973, 8 Gloucester was purchased from Jack Molesworth by Niceno Mastrobuono and Robert W. Zimmerman, trustees of the Eight Gloucester Street Realty Trust. On October 12, 1973, they converted the property into 17 condominium units, the 8 Gloucester Street Condominium.

8 Gloucester (Demolished)

The original house at 8 Gloucester was built ca. 1871, one of three contiguous houses (4-6-8 Gloucester) built for investment banker Henry Chapman Wainwright for speculative sale.

Henry C. Wainwright purchased the land for 4-6-8 Gloucester on May 23, 1871, from George Williams Pratt, an investment banker and stockbroker and one of the founders of the Boston Stock Exchange. He and his wife, Mary Barrow (White) Pratt, lived at 13 Louisburg Square. They also maintained a home, Oakley, on Belmont Avenue in Watertown (it became the Oakley Country Club in 1898). The land for 4-6-8 Gloucester originally was part of a larger parcel purchased from the Boston Water Power Company on February 20, 1863, by George Pratt’s son, Robert Marion Pratt, also a banker and broker.

When he sold the completed houses, Henry C. Wainwright included in the deeds a four foot wide easement across the rear of 4-6 Gloucester to provide access to the alley for 4-6 Gloucester and drainage to the alley for 4-6-8 Gloucester.

On June 15, 1872, 8 Gloucester was purchased from Henry C. Wainwright by John A. Dove of Andover. He was the founder of the Smith and Dove Manufacturing Company, which built the first flax mill in the United States.

8 Gloucester became the home of John Dove’s son-in-law and daughter, John Adams Blanchard, Jr., and Laura Smith (Dove) Blanchard. In 1872, they had lived at 58 Beacon with his father.

John Blanchard was a shipping merchant in the Calcutta trade and later a cotton commission merchant.  He had retired in 1872.

On February 1, 1876, John Dove transferred a two-sevenths undivided interest in 8 Gloucester to Laura Blanchard. In May of 1876, he purchased 4 Gloucester, which became the home of his son-in-law and daughter, attorney William Phillips Walley and Clara Lyell (Dove) Walley.

John Dove died in November of 1876. The remaining five-sevenths interest in 8 Gloucester was inherited by Laura Blanchard and her five siblings, Clara (Dove) Walley, George William Webster Dove, Isabella Dove, Helen C. Dove, and Mary A. (Dove) Johnson, the wife of Francis Howe Johnson. On December 10, 1879, John Blanchard;s sister, Sarah Harding Blanchard, acquired their interests and on December 13, 1879, she transferred the property to Laura Blanchard.

John and Laura Blanchard continued to live at 8 Gloucester during the 1880-1881 winter season.

The house was not listed in the 1882 Blue Book.

By the 1882-1883 winter season, 8 Gloucester was the home of cotton merchant Francis Williams Sargent and his wife, Jane Welles (Hunnewell) Sargent.  They had married in November of 1881, and 8 Gloucester may have been their first home together.  They also maintained a home in Wellesley. They continued to live at 8 Gloucester during the 1884-1885 season, after which they moved to 183 Marlborough while awaiting completion of their new Boston home at 40 Hereford, where they were living by the 1887-1888 season.

John Blanchard died in March of 1885 while traveling in Florence, Italy, and by the 1885-1886 winter season, 8 Gloucester was once again Laura Blanchard’s home.  She married again, in February of 1888, to George Alexander Philips Duncan (later Duncan-Haldane).

George Duncan was an engineer (thirty years later, in June of 1918, he would become the 4th Earl of Camperdown of Lundie upon the death of his brother, Robert).

After their marriage the Duncans made 6 Gloucester their Boston home but frequently spent the winters elsewhere and leased the house to others.

During the 1888-1889 winter season, 8 Gloucester was the home of Daniel Denny and his wife, Mary DeForest (Bigelow) Denny.  They previously had lived at 287 Beacon.  They also maintained a home in Milton.  Daniel Denny was a dry goods commission merchant in the firm of Denny, Poor & Co., doing business in Boston and New York.  Daniel Denny’s unmarried brother, Clarence Holbrook Denny, lived with them.  He was a wool dealer.  By the 1889-1890 season, they had moved to 401 Marlborough.

8 Gloucester was not listed in the 1890 Blue Book.

During the 1890-1891 season, George and Laura (Dove) Duncan were living at 8 Gloucester.  For the next two season, they were again living elsewhere.

During the 1891-1892 winter season, it was the home of wholesale dry goods merchant Joseph Stevens Kendall and his wife, Ellen (King) Kendall.  They previously had lived at 315 Dartmouth.  By the 1892-1893 season, they had moved to 316 Beacon.

8 Gloucester was not listed in the 1893 Blue Book.

By the 1893-1894 winter season, George and Laura (Dove) Duncan had resumed living at 8 Gloucester  They continued to live there during the 1894-1895 season, but were again living elsewhere for the next two season.

During the 1895-1896 winter season, 8 Gloucester was the home of Anna Smith (Miller) Bigelow, the widow of former Massachusetts Chief Justice George Tyler Bigelow, their daughter, Caroline Miller (Bigelow) Amory, the wife of George Washington Amory (who was living separately at 10 Charles), and Mrs. Amory’s daughters, Caroline and Constance Amory.  Mrs. Bigelow and Mrs. Amory previously had lived at 234 Beacon.  They continued to live at 8 Gloucester during the 1896-1897 season, but moved thereafter.  Caroline Amory and her daughters moved to the Hotel Victoria at 273 Dartmouth and then to 228 Beacon.  Anna Bigelow moved elsewhere and by 1900 was living in Quincy.

By the 1897-1898 winter season, the Duncans were living at 8 Gloucester again.  They continued to live there until about 1901.

During the 1901-1902 winter season, 8 Gloucester was the home of note broker Frederick Strong Moseley and his wife, Helen (Carpenter) Moseley.  They previously had lived in Newburyport.  By the 1902-1903 season, they had moved to 144 Beacon.

During the 1902-1903 winter season, 8 Gloucester was the home of Amy Gore (Walker) Iasigi, the widow of shipping merchant Oscar Iasigi. She previously had lived at 333 Commonwealth. She had moved by the next season and by the 1904-1905 season was living at 54 Beacon.

By the 1903-1904 winter season, the Duncans had resumed living at 8 Gloucester.

The Duncans continued to live there during the 1905-1906 winter season, but during the 1906-1907 season it was the home of paper manufacturer Charles Ellis Mason and his wife, Elizabeth (Andrew) Mason.  They had married in July of 1905.  Prior to their marriage, he had lived at 347 Commonwealth with his parents, Mortimer Blake Mason and Mary Emma (Phillips) Mason,  and she had lived at 32 Hereford with her aunt, Edith Andrew.  Charles and Elizabeth Mason continued to live at 8 Gloucester during the 1907-1908 season, after which they moved to 25 Exeter.

The Duncans were again living at 8 Gloucester by the 1908-1909 winter season. They continued to live there in until her death in August of 1910. George Duncan moved soon thereafter, and by the 1911-1912 season, he was living at 62 Commonwealth.

On January 25, 1912, 8 Gloucester was acquired from Laura Duncan’s estate by Frederick Lewis Dabney, trustee of the Gloucester Trust.

8 Gloucester was razed soon thereafter.