441 Beacon

441 Beacon (2013)

441 Beacon (2013)

Lot 24' x 112' (2,688 sf)

Lot 24′ x 112′ (2,688 sf)

441 Beacon is located on the south side of Beacon, between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue, with 435 Beacon to the east and 443 Beacon to the west.

441 Beacon was designed by architect George Alden Avery and built in 1887 by his father, Alden Avery, a builder.  Alden and George A. Avery are shown as the owners on the original building permit application, dated May 10, 1887, and Alden Avery is shown as the owner on the 1888 Bromley map.

By the 1888-1889 winter season, it was the home of Francis Edward Bacon and his wife, Louisa (Crowninshield) Bacon. They previously had lived at 398 Beacon.  They also maintained a home in Mattapoisett.  Francis Bacon is shown as the owner of 441 Beacon on the 1890, 1895, and 1898 Bromley maps.

Francis Bacon was a broker and commission merchant.

During the 1889-1890 winter season, the Bacons were living elsewhere and 441 Beacon was the home John Eliot Sanford and his wife, Emily Jane (White) Sanford.  Their primary residence was in Taunton.

John Sanford was an attorney and former member of the State Senate and State House of Representative, having served as Speaker of the House in the early 1870s.  From 1882 to 1892, he was Chairman of the State Harbor and Land Commission, and from 1892 to 1899 he was Chairman of the State Railroad Commission.

The Sanfords had moved from 441 Beacon by the 1890-1891 season, and by the 1891-1892 season were living at 292 Marlborough.

By the 1890-1891 winter season, 441 Beacon was once again the Bacons’ home.  They continued to live there during the 1894-1895 winter season, but moved thereafter.

During the 1895-1896 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of dry goods commission merchant Joseph Sargent, Jr., and his wife, Nellie Louise (McClure) Sargent.  They previously had lived at 235 Commonwealth.  By the 1896-1897 winter season, they had moved to 166 Marlborough.

In 1897, 441 Beacon was the home of Perkins Bass and his wife, Clara (Foster) Bass.  They previously had lived at 222 Beacon.  They also maintained a home in Petersborough, New Hampshire.  Perkins Bass had been an attorney in Chicago and served as US District Attorney for Northern Illinois during the Lincoln Administration.  They had moved by 1898, probably to Petersborough, where they were living at the time of his death in October of 1899.

441 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

441 Beacon (ca. 1942), photograph by Bainbridge Bunting, courtesy of The Gleason Partnership

By the 1897-1898 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Mrs. Lydia Bowman (Baker) Edwards Taft, the widow of John H. Edwards and of Orray A. Taft, Jr.  She continued to live there in 1899, but had moved to 341 Marlborough by 1900.

During the 1899-1900 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Charles A. King and his wife, Gertrude Frances (Wright) King.  They previously had lived at The Charlesgate at 535 Beacon.

Charles and Gertrude King had come to Boston in about 1872 from England.  He was a brewer and owned the Continental Brewing Company.  In August of 1900, Continental and nine other companies merged to become the Massachusetts Breweries Company.  By 1901, the Kings had purchased and moved to 41 Commonwealth.

During the 1900-1901 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Mrs. Abbie Bartlett (Adams) Worthington, widow of Roland Worthington, publisher of The Daily Evening Traveller newspaper. She previously had lived at 9 Hawthorn in Roxbury.   By 1902, she had moved to 471 Beacon.

441 Beacon was not listed in the 1902 Blue Book.

By the 1902-1903 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of retired cotton manufacturer Moses Brown Lockwood Bradford and his wife, Florence (Hoar) Bradford.  They had lived in an apartment at the Hotel Royal at 295-297 Beacon in 1902.  They also maintained a home in Concord.

They continued to live at 441 Beacon in 1904, but had moved to 102 Beacon by 1905.

By the 1904-1905 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Maria Louisa (Alexander) Richards Aldrich.  She was the widow of Reuben Francis Richards and of Charles Frost Aldrich.   She previously had lived in Saranac Lake, New York, where Charles Aldrich had died in March of 1904.  She is shown as the owner of 441 Beacon on the 1908 and 1917 Bromley maps and was the assessed owner through 1925.

Her children — Junius Alexander Richards, Louisa Beverly Richards, and Lillian Aldrich — lived with her.

In 1908, she was joined by Mrs. Henrietta Clementine (Bright) Inches, the widow of cotton broker John Chester Inches.  In 1907, she had lived at 166 Marlborough.  By 1909, she had moved to 18 Exeter.

Maria Aldrich and her children continued to live at 441 Beacon during the 1918-1919 winter season.  During that season, they were joined by Major Donald Armstrong and his wife, Frances Richards (Newcomb) Armstrong.  Frances Armstrong was the niece of Maria Aldrich’s first husband, Reuben Richards (she was the daughter of Warren Putnam Newcomb and Caroline Frances (Richards) Newcomb).  Donald Armstrong was a career military officer who served in World War I and World War II, retiring in 1946 as a Brigadier General.

By the 1919-1920 winter season, Maria Aldrich had moved to an apartment at 421 Marlborough.

During the 1919-1920 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Rear Admiral Herbert Omar Dunn, commandant of the Charlestown Navy Yard, and his wife, Eleanor (Cameron) Walker Palmer Dunn. Eleanor Dunn’s niece, Miss Eleanor Cameron Opie (daughter of John Opie, II, and Margaret Keyser (Cameron) Opie of Baltimore), lived with them.  By the 1920-1921 season, they had moved to 465 Beacon.

During the 1920-1921 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Austin Staats Kibbee and his wife, Ruth Lewis (Crossett)_Appleton Kibbee.  They previously had lived in Cambridge.  A retired naval officer, he was a shoe manufacturer in his father-in-law’s firm, the Crossett Shoe Company, of which he would later become president and treasurer.  By 1922, they had moved to 209 Bay State Road.

In 1922, 411 Beacon was once again the home of Junius Alexander Richards, the son of Maria Louisa (Alexander) Richards Aldrich.  He had graduated from Harvard in 1916.  Also living at 411 Beacon was George A. Brown.

During the 1922-1923 winter season, 411 Beacon was the home of Shepard Krech and his wife, Mary Stevens (Chapin) Krech.  In 1922, they had lived at 393 Beacon.

He was a student at Harvard Medical School and later would become a noted physician and surgeon in New York City.

During the 1923-1924 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of banker Louis Curtis, Jr., and his wife, Mary Sloan (Colt) Curtis.  They previously had lived at 447 Beacon.  By the next season, they had moved to 115 Marlborough.

During the 1924-1925 winter season, 441 Beacon was the home of Arthur Cecil Butler and his wife, Cicely (Hyland) Butler.  In 1923, they had lived at 162 Riverway.  He was an importer of textile machinery.  By the next season, they had moved to 302 Berkeley.

In the fall of 1925, Martha Aldrich sold 441 Beacon to Zelas Crocker, Jr.  The transaction was reported in the Boston Globe on September 16, 1925.

By the 1925-1926 winter season, 441 Beacon was the fraternity house of the MIT Chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha.  The Lambda Zeta chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha was the assessed owner from 1926 and is shown as the owner on the 1928 and 1938 Bromley maps.

It remained the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity house until about 1961.

By 1961, 441 Beacon was owned by the George Najarian, trustee of the Penwood Realty Trust.  In November of 1961, the Trust filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the property from a fraternity (lodging house) into ten apartments.

The property changed hands.  It remained an apartment house in 2015.