Newbury Street Stable Block – South Side

The south side of Newbury between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue was developed between 1878 and the early-to-mid-1880s.  All but two of the buildings were completed by 1886, and the last two were built in 1892 and 1899.

The summaries below discuss the early ownership and subdivision of the land, and then trace the evolution of the individual buildings from when they were built until they were first converted into commercial uses. The summaries also include information on some of the coachmen (and later chauffeurs) who lived above the stables with their families. In addition to being the homes of the coachmen, most stables also served as dwellings for the hostlers, grooms, and stablemen who worked in the stables.

Included are entries on the following buildings:

Land Ownership and Subdivision

As of 1872, the eastern half of the land on the south side of Newbury between Hereford and Massachusetts Avenue (formerly West Chester Park) was owned by the Boston Water Power Company, with a frontage on Newbury of 326.76 feet. The western boundary ran southwest at a 45 degree angle to the Boston and Albany Railroad tracks and then south east from there to Boylston.  The land to the west, running at a 45 degree angle southwest and with a frontage on Newbury of 177.16 feet was owned by the Back Bay Land Company (Russell A. Ballou, Constantine C. Esty, Oliver S. Sanford, Wilbur F. Claflin, and John S. Lamming, trustees), and the land west of that, with a frontage of 136.08 feet on Newbury, was owned by David N, Skillings.

Land on the south side of Newbury as of January 1872

On March 1, 1872, the Boston Water Power Company’s land was among several large parcels purchased from the company by Grenville T. W. Braman, Henry D. Hyde, and Frank W. Andrews, trustees of a real estate investment trust known as the Beacon Street Lands Trust. The Trust subsequently conveyed the southern portion to the City of Boston and established a passageway (now Alley 444) along the southern boundary of their property. The passageway was twenty feet wide, rather than the sixteen feet width of other alleys in the Back Bay. As a result, the depth of the lots on the south side of Newbury is 110 feet rather than 112 feet, as they are elsewhere on Newbury.

The Trust subdivided its land and began selling lots in 1878. Each of the lots was 110 feet deep (north-south) and all of the deeds included language requiring that the buildings be set back ten feet from the property line. By December of 1880, the Trust had sold the lots at 320-340 Newbury, leaving a triangular lot at the western boundary of their land.

Land on the south side of Newbury as of December 10, 1880

Between December 1 and December 10, 1880, real estate dealer George Wheatland, Jr., acquired the western portion of the block through a series of transactions. On December 10, 1880, he purchased the triangular lot at the boundary with the Beacon Street Lands Trust, with a frontage of 6.26 feet on Newbury, thereby creating a boundary perpendicular to Newbury 320.50 feet west of Hereford. The lots located at 320-340 Newbury and the eastern 19 feet of 342 Newbury were on land previously owned by the Trust. Six feet of the the lot at 342 Newbury and the lots at 344-360 Newbury were on land owned by George Wheatland, Jr.

George Wheatland, Jr., subdivided his land into seven 110 foot deep lots at 344-356 Newbury, extending the passageway at the rear of the lots and including language in the deeds requiring a ten foot setback. He reserved the corner lot for himself, with a 118.5 foot frontage on Newbury and a 100 foot frontage on Massachusetts Avenue. The southern boundary of the lot extended southwest at a 45 degree angle, along the Boston and Albany Railroad’s tracks, with the eastern boundary about 150 feet long. The passageway extended only a few feet into the lot.

320 Newbury

320 Newbury at the southeast corner of Newbury and Hereford was designed by architects Fletcher Ashley and John Myer and built in 1965-1966 as a six-story concrete and steel building for the Boston Architectural College (known as the Boston Architectural Center until 2006).

The College had acquired 320 Newbury in June of 1961 when it was required to move from its original building on Somerset Street, which was taken by Boston urban renewal.  The College used the existing former stable and garage building at 320 Newbury while raising funds for a new building. It conducted a nationwide competition for the design, and Ashley, Myer & Associates of Cambridge were selected.

The building opened on May 8, 1966, with a dedication ceremony that included Governor John A. Volpe, Mayor John E. Collins, and noted modernist architect Walter Gropius.

Architect Joseph L. Eldredge described the building in detail in his May 15, 1966, “Today’s Architecture” column in Boston Globe, under the heading “In the Spirit of Back Bay.” He commented that, “designed with a sense of responsibility to its environment, this remarkable lexicon of spaces acts as a transition between the Newbury street neighbors and the larger buildings of the Prudential Center. … A large building, it sets a good example of how to seem small on a tight urban lot, and to be prepared for the inevitable changes that will take place around it.”

In May of 1986, the Boston Architectural College acquired 322 Newbury as an annex to its building.

320 Newbury (Demolished)

320 Newbury (1905); Boston Herald, 15Mar1905

320 Newbury was designed by architect William R. Emerson and built in 1878 as a three story plus basement brick livery stable with a 66 foot frontage on Newbury and a 110 foot frontage on Hereford. It was built for livery stable operators James A. Riedell and Franklin B. Riedell, brothers, who purchased the land on June 27, 1878 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al of the Beacon Street Lands Trust.

James Riedell and his wife, Charlotte Osgood (Jones) Riedell lived at 385 Columbus Avenue, and Franklin Riedell and his wife, Helena B. (Holdredge) Riedell lived next door, at 383 Columbus.

Charlotte Riedell died in November of 1896 and James Riedell died in January of 1899.  His half-interest in 320 Newbury was inherited by his daughters, Charlotte O. Riedell and Ella Gertrude (Riedell) Babcock, the wife of Wilbur C. Babcock. Franklin Ridell continued to operate the stable.

320 Newbury originally was designed to accommodate 80 horses. In 1902, Franklin Riedell filed with the Board of Health for permission to increase the size of the stable, the Boston Evening Transcript reporting on June 5, 1902, that he planned to add sixty stalls and raise the building by about fourteen feet, increasing it to five stories. The application met with strong opposition from neighboring landowners and appears to have been denied.

320 Newbury (1905); Boston Globe, 30Apr1905

On July 8, 1902, 320 Newbury was offered for sale at auction, the auction notice in the Boston Herald indicating that the “sale is positive, to settle an estate.” The notice also observed that the “location of this corner makes it the most valuable in the Back Bay for its present business, or a splendid situation for an apartment house.”

The auction appears to have been conducted to determine the value of the property so that Franklin Riedell could purchase his nieces’ interests.  The successful bidder was Wallace Fullam Robinson of 296 Commonwealth, who probably was acting on behalf of the family. He took title to the property on July 18, 1902, from Franklin Riedell and his nieces, and then transferred it back to Frank Riedell on August 12. 1902.

Franklin Riedell continued to operate the stable until 1905.

On January 31, 1905, the White Sewing Machine Company purchased the property from Franklin Riedell and converted it into a salesroom, office, repair, and garage facility for the sale of its White steam-powered automobiles. In 1906-1907, they built a six-story garage on the north side of the block, at 341 Newbury.

320 Newbury was puchased by the Boston Architectural College in June of 1961. It was demolished in 1964.

360 Newbury (ca. 1961); courtesy of the Boston Architectural College Archives Photograph Col/ection

322 Newbury

322 Newbury (2022)

322 Newbury was built in 1878 as a six-horse, two story brick stable and dwelling on a 30.5 foot wide lot. It was built for Boston Herald editor and publisher Charles H. Andrews and his wife, Josephine (Maralious) Andrews, of 401 Beacon. Josephine Andrews purchased the lot in April of 1878 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al. trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust.  The April 10, 1878, permit application and December 16, 1878, final building inspection report indicate the builders as John W. Leighton, mason, and MacKenzie & Campbell (William MacKenzie and Thomas S. Campbell), carpenters. No architect is indicated.

By 1882, 322 Newbury was the home of Olof Swenson, the Andrewses’ coachman. He continued to live there in 1893.

Josephine Andrews died in October of 1887.

In January of 1894, Charles Andrews sold 322 Newbury to real estate dealer Samuel H. Whitwell of 111 Commonwealth. He also was owner of lots at 325-327-329 Newbury, across the street, which he was seeking to develop, and a stable at 331 Newbury.

In April of 1895, Samuel Whitwell sold 322 Newbury to Robert Stow Bradley, president of the Bradley Fertilizer Company. He and his wife, Leslie (Newell) Bradley, lived at 255 Marlborough.

By 1896, 322 Newbury was the home of the Bradleys’ coachman, Joseph Peele, and his wife, Mary A. (Mooney) Peele.  They continued to live there until about 1905. He was replaced by George John Hicks, who lived there with his wife, Eliza (Farley) Hicks, until about 1913.

In 1917, the Bradleys converted 322 Newbury into a garage and it was the home of his chauffeur, Thomas Francis Lawler, and his wife, Abbie Gibbs (Morse) Lawler.  They continued to live there until about 1921.

Leslie Bradley died in March of 1919.

In 1923 and 1924, 322 Newbury was the home of Robert Bradley’s chauffeur, James Harvey Clark, and his wife, Ada Kathleen (Armstong) Clark.

By 1925, Hugh MacIsaac had become Robert Bradley’s chauffeur and he and his wife, Clara H. (MacDonald) MacIsaac, lived at 322 Newbury. They continued to live there until his death in May of 1936.

Hugh MacIsaac was succeeded as Robert Bradley’s chauffeur by Frank Alphonse Hansen, who lived at 322 Newbury with his wife, Anna Martina (Anderson) Hansen, until Robert Bradley’s death in September of 1945.

On March 29, 1946, 322 Newbury was acquired by Edward K. Perry, a painting firm specializing in the original decoration and restoration of historic buildings.

322 Newbury remained in the Perry family until it was purchased by the Boston Architectural College on May 15, 1986.

324 Newbury

324 Newbury (2022)

324 Beacon, a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 25 foot frontage, was designed by architects Shaw and Shaw and built in 1879 by Rumery & Maxwell (William M. Rumery and John S. Maxwell), masons and contractors, one of a symmetrical pair (324-326 Newbury). 324 Newbury was built for banker Hollis Hunnewell. He purchased the lot in April of 1878 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al. trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust, and is shown as the owner on the original building permit application dated May 28, 1879.

Hollis Hunnewell and his wife, Louisa (Bronson) Hunnewell, lived at 315 Dartmouth.

324 Newbury became the home of the Hunnewells’ coachman, Philip Fitzpatrick, and his wife, Christina (Sangster) Fitzpatrick. They lived there until about 1887.

Hollis Hunnewell died in June of 1884 and Louisa Hunnewell died in November of 1890.

The Hunnewell family continued to own 324 Newbury and, from about 1891 to 1894, it was the home of coachman John Gay Basson and his wife, Emma (Krieg) Basson.

In February of 1894, Hollis and Louisa Hunnewell’s son, Hollis Horatio Hunnewell, purchased the property from his father’s estate.

In June of 1898, 324 Newbury was purchased from Hollis Hunnewell by wholesale dry goods merchant Joseph Stevens Kendall. He and his wife, Ellen B. (King) Kendall, lived at 305 Commonwealth. Their son and law and daughter, Richard Fairfax Bolles and Mary (Kendall) Bolles, lived with them.

From about 1900 to 1904, 324 Newbury was the home of coachman Robert Sams, who was unmarried.

Joseph Kendall died in April of 1903 and Ellen Kendall died in June of 1909. 324 Newbury was inherited by their daughter. The Bolleses continued to live at 305 Commonwealth and to own 324 Newbury until the mid-1920s.

From 1905, 324 Newbury was the home of coachman John Edwin Burgess and his wife, Mabel Emma (Selby) Burgess. She was the daughter of William J. Selby, who was coachman for Nehemiah W. Rice and lived at 349 Newbury.

John Burgess was coachman for Ellen Kendall and, after her death, for Richard and Mary Bolles. He died in October of 1913. the victim of accidental poisoning. By that time, the Bolleses appear to have converted 324 Newbury into an automobile garage and John Burgess is identified as both their coachman and chauffeur on his death certificate.

Boston Globe, 28Oct1928

John Burgess’s brother, George Edward Burgess, took his place as chauffeur for Richard and Ellen Bolles.  He and his wife, Lucy (Harris) Burgess, lived at 324 Newbury until about 1925, when Bolleses sold the property.

By 1925, 324 Newbury was owned by banker Kevie Carmen who converted it into commercial property and, in October of 1925, leased the basement to the Modern Heating & Engineering Company. The street level became a private night club, the Club Marco, which opened on October 30, 1925, and was described in a November 29, 1925, Boston Herald article as “Boston’s first supper dance club.” In September of 1926, the property was sold by Kevie Carmen to the Club Marco.

By 1928, 324 Newbury had become the Embassy Club, a night club open to the public, and by 1930 the Rendezvous, which was raided on April 8, 1930, and padlocked because it was found to be serving alcohol in violation of Prohibition.

326 Newbury

326 Newbury (2022)

326 Newbury, a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 23 foot frontage, was designed by architects Shaw and Shaw and built in 1879 by Rumery & Maxwell (William M. Rumery and John S. Maxwell), masons and contractors, one of a symmetrical pair (324-326 Newbury). 326 Newbury was built for attorney John Torrey Morse, Jr. and his wife, Fanny (Hovey) Morse, who lived at 9 Fairfield and in Prides Crossing. Fanny Morse purchased the lot in April of 1878 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al. trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust, and John Torey Morse is shown as the owner on the original building permit application dated May 28, 1879.

326 Newbury became the home of the Morses’ coachman, Thomas Norris, and his wife, Mary (Brickley) Norris. They continued continued to live at 326 Newbury until about 1885, when they moved to Beverly, where he continued to be the Morses’ coachman until his death in August of 1890.

By 1890, it appears that the Morses had leased 326 Newbury to mining investor Albert Smith Bigelow. He and his wife, Mary (DeFord) Bigelow, lived at 30 Gloucester.

The Bigelows’ coachman, Walter Wixon, and his wife, Christine (McLeod) Wixon, lived at 326 Newbury from about 1890.

Boston Herald, 4Jul1920

In April of 1894, the Morses sold 326 Newbury to Albert Bigelow. The Wixons continued to live there until about 1912.

In September of 1916, 326 Newbury was acquired from Albert Bigelow by the Old Dominion Copper Mining and Smelting Company, and in January of 1918 it was acquired from the company by James R. Taylor, treasurer of the American Storage Battery Company.  In February of 1918, he filed for (and subsequently received) permission to convert the building into a factory to manufacture automobile storage batteries, the application specifying that “no cars will be run into the building it being a factory and not a service station.”

320-330 Newbury (ca 1962), courtesy of Samuel D. Perry

328 Newbury

328 Newbury (2022)

328 Newbury was built in 1880 as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 22 foot frontage. It was built for shipping merchant Thomas Forbes Cushing. The May 6, 1880, Boston Post’s summary of the building permit indicates that it was built by Vinal & Dodge (Warren D. Vinal and Charles A. Dodge), masons; no architect is mentioned. Thomas Cushing and his brother, John Gardiner Cushing, purchased the lots at 328 Newbury and 330 Newbury in January of 1880 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al, trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust (Thomas Cushing purchased 330 Newbury and John Cushing purchased 328 Newbury, and they then exchanged lots that same month).

Thomas Cushing and his wife, Fanny (Grinnell) Cushing, lived at 163 Marlborough. She died in May of 1887 and he moved to New York City in the early 1890s.

The Cushings’ coachman, George Edward Voss, and his wife, Elizabeth (Mann) Voss, lived at 328 Newbury until the early 1890s. He was among the coachmen mentioned (with a drawn portrait captioned incorrectly as George Vose) in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.”

After Thomas Cushing moved to New York City, George Voss became coachman for Frederick Lothrop Ames and his wife, Rebecca (Blair) Ames. George and Elizabeth Voss moved to the Ames stable at 344 Newbury.

In September of 1894, 328 Newbury was purchased from Thomas Cushing by wholesale druggist Andrew Gray Weeks. He and his wife, Harriet (Pierce) Weeks, lived at 400 Beacon.

By 1898, 328 Newbury was the home of their coachman, John H. Burns. He married in Janurary of 1899 to Josephine Murray, and they lived at 328 Newbury until about 1909.

Andrew Weeks died in June of 1903 and Harriet Weeks died in August of 1908.

In February of 1911, 328 Newbury was purchased from the Weeks family by investment banker Frank Everett Peabody. He purchased the stable at 330 Newbury at the same time. He and his wife, Gertrude (Bayley) Peabody, lived at 120 Commonwealth.

In March of 1911, Frank Peabody applied for (and subsequently received) permission to convert 328 Newbury into a private garage, with the remodeling designed by Peabody and Stearns.

It appears that Frank Peabody operated 328 and 330 Newbury in tandem, with 328 Newbury as an automobile garage and 330 Newbury as a stable and coach house, with chauffeurs and coachmen living at both addresses.

From about 1913 to 1915, Patrick F. O’Neill, a coachman, lived at 330 Newbury, but appears to have moved thereafter. By 1920, he was living at 328 Newbury, listed in the City Directories as a coachman until the mid-1920s, after which he was listed as a chauffeur. He continued to live there until about 1933.

Frank Peabody died in September of 1918.  Gertrude Peabody remarried in April of 1920 to William Storer Eaton, treasurer of the Betty’s Neck Company, cranberry growers. They continued to live at 120 Commonwealth with Frank and Gertrude Peabody’s only surviving child, Amelia Peabody. They sold the stable at 330 Newbury in 1922, but kept 328 Newbury as their garage.

Gertrude Storer died in April of 1937 and William Eaton died in March of 1949. Amelia Peabody, a sculptress, continued to live at 120 Commonwealth.

From 1934 through 1947, 328 Newbury was shown in the City Directories as being vacant but probably was used as a garage without a permanent resident. By 1948, it was the home of Amelia Peabody’s chauffeur, George Edward Chamberlain, and his wife, Effie M. (Turner) Root Chamberlain. They continued to live there until his death in February of 1965.

Amelia Peabody continued to own the property until her death in May of 1984. The apartment at 328 Newbury remained a residence, and from about 1965 until the early 1970s the former garage became the American Red Cross Arts and Skills Center.

In January of 1985, 328 Newbury was purchased from Amelia Peabody’s estate by Sam Y. Kim, who converted it into offices and an apartment.

330 Newbury

330 Newbury (2022)

330 Newbury was built in 1892-1893 as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 22 frontage. It was built real estate investor Charles Uriah Cotting. He and his wife, Susan (Delano) Cotting, lived at 249 Commonwealth. The permit application, dated August 10, 1892, indicates that 330 Newbury was designed by architects Snell and Gregerson and built by Neal & Preble (Alfred J. Neal and Joseph H. Preble), masons.

The land at 330 Newbury originally had been purchased by Thomas F. Cushing in January of 1880 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al, trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust. He transferred it to his brother, John Gardiner Cushing, that same month. It subsequently changed hands, remaining vacant, and was purchased by Charles Cotting in February of 1881, who built the stable eleven years later.

From about 1893 to 1899, the Cottings’ coachman was Timothy Sullivan, who lived at 267 West Second Street.  During this time, several different stablemen and hostlers lived at 330 Newbury.

Susan Cotting died in June of 1896 and Charles Cotting died in April of 1903.

From about 1900, 330 Newbury was the home of Dennis J. Healey and his wife, Catharine (Malloy) Healey. He was coachman for Robert Chamblet Hooper, president of the Constitution Wharf Company, and his wife, Helen (Ames) Hooper. They lived at 448 Beacon and presumably leased 330 Newbury from the Cotting family.  Helen Hooper died in February of 1907 and Robert Hooper died in August of 1908. The Healeys had moved from 330 Newbury by 1909.

In February of 1911, 330 Newbury was purchased from Charles Cotting’s estate by investment banker Frank Everett Peabody. He purchased the stable at 328 Newbury at the same time. He and his wife, Gertrude (Bayley) Peabody, lived at 120 Commonwealth,

Frank Peabody remodeled 328 Newbury as a garage, but appears to have kept 330 Newbury as a stable and coach house, with chauffeurs and coachmen living at both addresses.

Boston Herald, 30Nov1924

From about 1913 to 1915, Patrick F. O’Neill, a coachman, lived at 330 Newbury, but appears to have moved thereafter. By 1920, he was living at 328 Newbury, listed in the City Directories as a coachman until the mid-1920s, after which he was listed as a chauffeur.

Frank Peabody died in September of 1918.  Gertrude Peabody remarried in April of 1920 to William Storer Eaton, treasurer of the Betty’s Neck Company, cranberry growers. They continued to live at 120 Commonwealth with Frank and Gertrude Peabody’s only surviving child, Amelia Peabody.

In April of 1922, 330 Newbury was purchased by real estate dealer William P. Natale.  It subsequently changed hands and in 1924 was converted into a garage, store, and office.

From 1924 until about 1929, 330 Newbury was leased to Robert Dickson, who lived there and operated Pinkham’s Back Bay Express Company from the building. By 1930, he had moved to 351 Newbury.

Also from about 1924 to 1928, 330 Newbury was the location of the Universal Auto Cover Company.

332 Newbury

332 Newbury (2022)

332 Newbury was built in 1899 as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 22 foot frontage, for real estate dealer Samuel H. Whitwell of 111 Commonwealth. It was the last stable built on the south side of the block. At about the same time, Samuel Whitwell built a stable at 335 Newbury, which was the last stable built on the north side. The land for 332 Newbury originally had been purchased in January of 1880 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al, trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust by William Powell Mason of 211 Commonwealth but had remained vacant. Samuel Whitwell purchased the land from William Mason in June of 1899.

In June of 1902, 332 Newbury was purchased from Samuel Whitwell by Dr. Charles Parker Lyman and his son, Dr. Richard Pope Lyman, who operated a veterinary hospital in the stable.

Boston Herald, 27Jun1909

Charles Lyman had retired in 1901 as Dean of the Harvard School of Veterinary Medicine. He and his wife, Lucy (Pope) Lyman, lived in an apartment at 308-310 Commonwealth and, before that, in Cambridge. In about 1904, Richard Lyman moved to Hartford, Connecticut, and soon after that, Charles and Lucy Lyman moved to 4 Gloucester to live with their son-in-law and daughter, Joseph Smith Sylvester and Mary (Lyman) Sylvester. He was a manufacturer of tack.

Charles Lyman retired in about 1907, and he and his wife moved to Whittier, California. In March of 1911, Joseph Sylvester acquired 332 Newbury from Charles and Richard Lyman. It continued to be a veterinary hospital until about 1915.

Boston Herald, 17Feb1924

In April of 1919, 332 Newbury was purchased from Joseph Sylvester by Osmon Burnap Gilman. He and his wife, Sarah Elizabeth (Wyman) Dow Gilman, lived in Cambridge and owned and operated the Bailey Candy Company in downtown Boston. They also were breeders of cocker spaniels and, by the mid-1920s, they had converted 332 Newbury into a dog kennel. Sarah Gilman died in May of 1943. Osmon Gilman continued to own 332 Newbury until August of 1959, when he sold it to Mabel L. Diab, wife of real estate dealer Thomas J. Diab.

The property was acquired in April of 1963 by the Paul G. Roberts Realty Trust, which remodeled the building into offices on first floor and photographer’s studio on second floor, with a garage in basement.

334 Newbury

334 Newbury (2022)

334 Newbury was built in 1880-1881 as a two-story plus basement stable and dwelling with a stone façade, one of a symmetrical pair (334-336 Newbury). The permit application for 334 Newbury has not as yet been located, but the permit application for 336 Newbury, dated June 8, 1880, indicates that it was designed by Snell and Gregerson and built by Webster & Dixon, masons. The stone for the front façade is identified as “Roxbury” stone.

334 Newbury was built for banker Eugene Van Rensselaer Thayer on land he purchased in February of 1881 from Charles U. Cotting. He and his wife, Susan (Spring) Thayer, lived at 23 Commonwealth. On March 22, 1881, the Boston Evening Transcript reported that he had filed a petition with the Board of Aldermen to occupy “a new brick stable for five horses,” and on March 29, 1881, Boston Herald listed his stable as among those “being erected.”

334 Newbury became the home of the Thayers’ coachman, James Coulter, and his wife, Mary A. (Grant) Coulter. The Coulters continued to live at 334 Newbury until about 1892.

The Thayers also had a second coachman, Millard Franklin Spear, who was a lodger at 334 Newbury from about 1887 through 1890. He married in October of 1891 to Eliza Ellen Cameron and subsequently became a riding master, for many years associated with the New Riding Club in Boston. In his February 21, 1934 Boston Globe obituary he was called the “dean of American riding masters.”

James Coulter and Millard Spear were among the coachmen profiled in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.”  The article included an illustration of them “on the box of Mr. E. V. R. Thayer’s Russian.”

By 1890, Eugene V. R. Thayer appears to have leased a second stable at 350 Newbury, which was owned by Mary Ann (Martyn) Baker, the widow of Ezra Howes Baker, of 117 Commonwealth.  James and Mary Coulter were living there in 1890, but then resumed living at 334 Newbury and 350 Newbury became the home of Joseph Lake, also a coachman for the Thayers, and his wife, Mary Jane (Bailey) Lake.

In about 1893, the Coulters moved back to 350 Newbury and the Lakes moved to 334 Newbury. They continued to live at 334 Newbury until about 1901.

By 1902, 334 Newbury was the home of the Thayers’ new coachman, Jules (Julius) Etienne Vuilleumier. He was unmarried and lived there until about 1904.

In 1905 and 1906, 344 Newbury was the home of coachman Michael J. Sherwin and his wife, Annie (Kenny) Sherwin, and from about 1907 to 1911, it was the home of coachman George Houghton and his wife, Annie Buchanan (McClelland) Houghton.

Eugene V. R. Thayer died in in December of 1907 and Susan Thayer died in March of 1911. 334 Newbury continued to be owned by the Thayer family.

By 1912, 334 Newbury was the home of coachman George William Harris.  The Thayer family probably converted the property into a garage in about 1915. It is still shown as a stable on the 1914 Sanborn map and George Harris is indicated as being a coachman in the 1914 City Directory; in the 1915 and 1916 Directories, he is described as being a chauffeur.

In February of 1918, 334 Newbury was purchased by Leonard Chase Wason and his wife, Annie Belle (Atwood) Redlon Wason. They lived in Brookline and he was president of the Aberthaw Construction Company. Prior to their purchase, the Thayer estate had entered into a five year lease, through 1922, with the Welsbach Street Lighting Company, previously located at 354 Newbury. On February 7, 1918, the company filed a permit application to remodel the property, converting it from a stable to offices, storage for street lamps, and a service station.

336 Newbury

336 Newbury (2022)

336 Newbury was designed by Snell and Gregerson and built in 1880-1881 by Webster & Dixon, masons, as a two-story plus basement stable and dwelling with a stone façade, one of a symmetrical pair (334-336 Newbury). The permit application, dated June 8, 1880, indicates that the stone for the front façade was “Roxbury” stone.

336 Newbury was built for investment banker Charles Albert Whittier, who is shown as the owner on the permit application. He purchased the land for the stable in January of 1880 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al, trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust. Charles Whittier and his wife, Elizabeth (Chadwick) Whittier, lived at 230 Beacon.

Soon after it was built, 336 Newbury became the home of the Whittiers’ coachman, John Manthorp, and his wife, Anna (Standring) Manthorp. They continued to live there until about 1884.

In January of 1884, Charles Whittier sold 336 Newbury to Henry Chapman Wainwright, Jr., an investment banker, and in April of 1884 he sold it to Mary Elisabeth Wright. She was the former wife of Charles Henry Todd (after their divorce, she and their children took her maiden name, Wright, as their surname). Mary Wright lived at 326 Dartmouth with her son, Charles Francis Wright.

From about 1886 to 1888, their coachman, Florence Sullivan, lived at 336 Newbury.

Also living there from about 1887 was Thomas Kearns, employed as a hostler in the stable. By about 1889, Dennis Mahoney had replaced Florence Sullivan and Thomas Kearns had also become a coachman. In its article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families,” the Boston Herald noted that Thomas Kearns “makes a stately and dignified driver for Charles F. Wright, while the other coachman drives for Mrs. Wright.”

By 1894, Dennis Mahoney had been replaced by John McCormick.

Thomas Kearns married in November of 1893 to Catharine McKague (McCague). They lived at 336 Newbury after their marriage. By the mid- to late 1890s, he appears to have been the only coachman for the Wright family.

Mary Wright died in July of 1900. 336 Newbury was inherited by Charles Wright and his brother, William James Wright of Duxbury.  Thomas Kearns continued to be Charles Wright’s coachman, and he and his wife continued to live at 336 Newbury.until about 1913.

Boston Herald, 9Apr1922

Charles Wright died in December of 1909 and William Wright died in December of 1912.

In April of 1915, 336 Newbury was purchased from Charles Wright’s estate and William Wright’s widow, Georgianna (Buckham) Wright, by Winthrop Henry Sargent. He and his wife, Aimée (Rotch) Sargent, lived at 207 Commonwealth.

Harry Crumpton, the Sargents’ coachman, lived at 336 Newbury.  He was unmarried.

Winthrop Sargent died in September of 1916. In January of 1918, Aimée Sargent entered into a lease with William Tufts and George Tufts, dealers in storage batteries, and on February 8, 1918, she filed an permit application  to convert the property from a stable and dwelling into a battery storage service station. She died in April of 1918, and in December of 1919 the property was acquired by Miss Elsie L. Mulvey of Cohasset, a stenographer in a real estate office who probably held the property on behalf of her employer.

By 1923, William and George Tufts moved their storage battery business to 333 Newbury, which they purchased in September of 1922.

338 Newbury

338 Newbury (2022)

338 Newbury was designed by Peabody and Stearns and built in 1886 by MacKenzie & Hersey (William MacKenzie and Ira G. Hersey), carpenters, as a three-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 50 foot frontage. It was built for Uriel Crocker and George W. Weld, who are shown as the owners on the building permit application, dated March 20, 1886. They had acquired the land in 1885, the combination of two 25 foot lots at 338-340 Newbury. Both lots had originally been 22 feet wide, but had been augmented through a series of transactions in 1880 and 1881 whereby the owner of the lot at 342 Newbury transferred 6 feet to the owner of the lot at 340 Newbury, who, in turn, transferred 3 feet to the owner of the lot at 338 Newbury.

In May of 1886, while the stable was under construction, Uriel Crocker and George Weld conveyed the property to Newbury Stable Company, which operated it as a “club stable” (a private stable where members could maintain stalls for their horses and storage space for their carriages).

Boston Globe 2Nov1913

By 1894, 338 Newbury was the home of the stable’s superintendent, Michael Francis Casey, and his wife, Mary Teresa (Collins) Casey. They continued to live there until his death in September of 1903.

In September of 1910, the Newbury Stable Company sold 338 Newbury to John P. Shea. In December of 1910, he entered into a ten year lease with the Motor Car Service Company of Boston and then conveyed the property and the lease to Theodore H. Tyndale, an attorney. The Motor Car Service Company converted the property into a garage, where it leased parking spaces, sold tires and automotive supplies, and rented automobiles.

342 Newbury

342 Newbury (2022)

342 Newbury was designed by Andrews and Jaques and built in 1885 by Lyman D. Willcut, mason, and Benjamin D. Whitcomb, carpenter. as a two-story plus basement stable and dwelling with a stone front on a 25 foot lot. The permit application, dated August 5, 1885, indicates that the stone for the front façade was “Milford granite.”

342 Newbury was built for Bayard Thayer, who is shown as the owner on the permit application. He lived at 305 Commonwealth with his mother, Cornelia (Van Rensselaer) Thayer, the widow of Nathaniel Thayer.

Bayard Thayer acquired the land for 342 Newbury in April of 1885 from William G. Saltonstall of 30 Fairfield.  He had acquired a 22 foot wide lot in January of 1881 from Grenville T. W. Braman et al, trustees of the Beacon Street Lands Trust, and an additional 9 feet to the west from George Wheatland, Jr.  He then transferred 6 feet to the owner of the land at 340 Newbury, resulting in the 25 foot lot he sold to Bayard Thayer.

By about 1887, 342 Newbury was the home of Bayard Thayer’s coachman, George Henry Brady. He previously had been a hostler for Eugene V. R. Thayer at his stable at 334 Newbury.  He was among the coachmen mentioned (with a drawn portrait) in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.” The article also noted that 342 Newbury “is the greatest stable of its kind in Boston … lighted by electricity is a perfect structure for the purposes for which it is used.”

Bayard Thayer married in September of 1896 to Ruth Simpkins. After their marriage they lived at 32 Hereford and in Lancaster.

George Brady continued to live at 342 Newbury until about 1913.

Bayard Thayer died in November of 1916. George Brady remained coachman for his family and, when he died in December of 1922 in Clinton, Massachusetts, was described in his death notice as “for 37 years a faithful friend in the family of the late Bayard Thayer.”

In November of 1919, 342 Newbury was purchased from Bayard Thayer’s estate by Dr. Lloyd Vernon Briggs, a physician and psychiatrist. He subsequently leased the property to the Wagner Electric Manufacturing Company, which converted it into a garage and offices. Dr. Briggs sold 342 Newbury in April of 1921, by which time it also was the location of Fifield, Richardson & Co., a trucking company.

342 Newbury was remodeled in 1931 into a store and offices. As part of the remodeling, designed by McLaughlin and Burr, the granite façade on the street level was replaced with a metal store front.

344 Newbury

344 Newbury (2022)

344 Newbury was built in 1881 as a ten-horse, two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 35 foot frontage, for railroad investor Frederick Lothrop Ames. He and his wife, Rebecca (Blair) Ames, lived at 306 Dartmouth, which they had acquired the previous year and were in the process of remodeling.  Frederick L. Ames purchased the land for 344 Newbury in December of 1880 from George Wheatland, Jr.

344 Newbury became the home of the Ameses’ coachman, Joseph Bingham, and his wife, Adelaide (Franklin) Bingham. He was among the coachmen mentioned (with a drawn portrait) in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.” The Binghams continued to live at 344 Newbury until about 1892.

Joseph Bingham was succeeded by George Edward Voss, who was the Ameses’ coachman from about 1893. He and his wife, Elizabeth (Mann) Voss, lived at 344 Newbury.  He previously had been coachman for Thomas F. Cushing and they had lived at 328 Newbury (he also had been mentioned in the February 17, 1889, Boston Herald article).

Frederick L. Ames died in September of 1893. George Voss continued as the Ames family coachman until about 1896.

By 1897, Peter Francis Williams was the Ames family coachman, and he and his wife, Margaret (Sheehan) Williams, lived at 344 Newbury. They continued to live there in 1899, but in 1900 and 1901 lived at 100 Lonsdale in Dorchester. They resumed living at 344 Newbury in about 1902 and continued to live there until about 1914.

Boston Herald, 26Apr1925

Rebecca Ames died in January of 1903 and 344 Newbury was inherited by her five surviving children. In April of 1903 Oliver Ames and Helen (Ames) Hooper, wife of Robert C. Hooper, transferred their interests to their unmarried siblings, Mary Shreve Ames, Frederick Lothrop Ames, Jr., and John Stanley Ames.  Frederick Ames, Jr., married in May of 1904 to Edith Callender Cryder and in March of 1905 transferred his interest to Mary Ames and John S. Ames. He married in April of 1909 to Anna (Nancy) Filley, and she married in May of 1916 to Louis Adams Frothingham.

By 1914, 344 Newbury had been converted into a garage, and by 1920 it had become the home of John S. Ames’s chauffeur, John James McMullen, and his wife, Georgina  (MacLennan) McMullen. In 1914, he had been a coachman for Herbert Sears of 287 Commonwealth and they had lived at 347 Newbury.  By 1917, he had become John S. Ames’s chauffeur and they were living in North Easton when he registered for the draft.

In February of 1923, 344 Newbury was purchased from John S. Ames and Mary (Ames) Frothingham by Lowell T. Clapp, treasurer of Otis Clapp & Son, homeopathic pharmacists. He remodeled the building for their research laboratories and for the Matthew J. Ryan company, wholesale and retail dealers in stoves and heating appliances.

346 Newbury

346 Newbury (2022)

346 Newbury was built in 1882 as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with 30 foot frontage, for leather manufacturer and dealer Stephen Everett Westcott. He and his wife, Abbie (Fuller) Westcott, lived at 146 Commonwealth. The permit application for 346 Newbury, dated April 12, 1883, indicates that it was designed and built by George W. Pope, who also had designed and built the Westcotts’ home on Commonwealth in 1876-1877.

Stephen Westcott acquired the land for 346 Newbury in January of 1882 from Nehemiah W. Rice, who had purchased it from George Wheatland, Jr., in December of 1880. Nehemiah Rice had purchased the land at about the same time he was having a house built at 341 Commonwealth. Instead of building a stable on his land at 346 Newbury, in October of 1884 he purchased the stable at 349 Newbury.

346 Newbury was the home of coachmen John Bliss in 1885, and Patrick Mannix (Mannis) in 1886-1887. In the Boston Herald’s February 17, 1889, article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families,” the Westcotts’ coachman is identified as Charles Hunnewell, which appears to be an error.  The article notes, however, that “Mr. Westcott keeps four or five good road steppers, and some turnouts, and he has a first-class driver.”

By 1893, 346 Newbury was the home of James H. O’Brien, a groom and stableman, and his wife, Ellen (Nellie) (Crowley) O’Brien. They continued to live there until about 1901.

Abbie Westcott died in March of 1901 and Stephen Westcott died in February of 1902.

In July of 1902, 344 Newbury was purchased from Stephen Westcott’s estate by investment banker George Edward Learnard, Jr. He was unmarried and lived at the Hotel Victoria at 273 Dartmouth.

346 Newbury became the home of George Learnard’s coachman, Patrick J. Quigley, and his wife, Catharine (Cryan) Quigley. They continued to live there until about 1908.

In October of 1908, 346 Newbury was purchased from George Learnard by Andrew Woodbury Preston, president of the United Fruit Company. He and his wife, Frances E. (Gutterson) Preston, lived in Swampscott and, by 1911, also at 25 Bay State Road.

346 Newbury (1912); courtesy of Geoff Stein

Andrew Preston converted 346 Newbury into a garage, and in 1909 and 1910 it was the home of his chauffeur, George Francis Gates.  George Gates married in September of 1911 to Ruth Gladys Gorey. After their marriage, they lived at 206 Massachusetts Avenue.

346 Newbury remained a garage for the Preston family and, by 1912, also was the home of Georgiana (Georgie) Ellen (McKenzie) Fraser, the widow of Duncan Fraser, who had died in August of 1908, and their two children, Elizabeth May Fraser and James Edwin Fraser. Duncan Fraser had been a coachman and probably had been employed by Andrew Preston.

Andrew Preston died in September of 1924 and Frances Preston died in July of 1930. Georgiana Fraser continued to live at 346 Newbury until her death in January of 1932.

346 Newbury continued to be owned by Andrew Preston’s estate and became the home of Daniel J. Moran and his wife, Mary (Walsh) Moran. He was a chauffeur for Andrew and Frances Preston’s daughter, Bessie Woodbury (Preston) Ong Cutler, the wife of Harold Garfield Cutler, a stock and bond broker. They lived at 334 Beacon.

Harold and Bessie Cutler separated in about 1937.  She continued to live at 334 Beacon until about 1940, after which she made her home in South Hamilton.  The Morans moved to Wenham at about the same time.

In October of 1940, 346 Newbury was purchased from Andrew Preston’s estate by George M. Foster, a caterer, who converted the building into a retail store and catering office.

348 Newbury

348 Newbury (2022)

348 Newbury was designed by Bradlee and Winslow and built in 1881 by Vinal & Dodge (Warren D. Vinal and Charles A. Dodge), masons, as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 25 foot frontage, one of two built at the same time in the same design (348-350 Newbury; 350 Newbury was demolished and replaced in 1915). As originally built, each stable had terra cotta animal heads on the eastern portion of the front façade, a cow and dog at 348 Newbury and a horse and a dog ar 350 Newbury, with the two dogs facing so that they appeared to be looking at each other.

348 Newbury was built for Oliver Ames, who is shown as the owner on the permit application, dated July 19, 1881. He was an investor in railroads, banks, and  manufacturing companies; he served as Lt. Governor of Massachusetts from 1882 to 1885 and as Governor in 1886 and 1887.  He and his wife, Anna (Ray) Ames, lived at 355 Commonwealth, which they were having built at about the same time as the stable at 348 Newbury.

Oliver Ames purchased the land for 348 Newbury in January of 1881 from George Wheatland, Jr.  The party walls between 348 and 350 Newbury and between 350 and 352 Newbury were built at a slight angle and were not precisely on the boundary lines.  To correct this deficiency, in May of 1882, Ezra Baker, the owner of 350 Newbury, transferred Oliver Ames a small strip of land with a 0.90 foot frontage on Newbury and a 0.09 foot frontage on the alley, and Walter Hunnewell, the owner of 352 Newbury, transferred Ezra Baker a small strip of land with a 0.36 foot frontage on Newbury and a 0.10 foot frontage on the alley. These transfers resulted in 348 Newbury having a 25 foot frontage on Newbury and the alley, and 350 Newbury having a 25.16 foot frontage on Newbury and a 25.01 foot frontage on the alley.

348 Newbury (1912); courtesy of Geoff Stein

348 Newbury became the home of Oliver Ames’s coachman, Alexander Watson. He was no longer listed in the City Directory after 1883.

By 1888, George H. Hamlin had become the Ameses’ coachman and he and his wife, Margaret (Murphy) Hamlin, lived at 348 Newbury. He was among the coachmen mentioned (with a drawn portrait) in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.”  Margaret Hamlin died in February of 1892, and George Hamlin married again in January of 1895 to Elizabeth E. Riordan.

Oliver Ames died in October of 1895. George Hamlin continued as the Ames family’s coachman, and he and his wife continued to live at 348 Newbury until about 1909.

Boston Globe, 15May1923

By 1910, 348 Newbury was the home of the Ames family’s new coachman, Richard J. Morrissey. He was a widower, his wife, Catherine T. (Sullivan) Morrissey, having died in May of 1908. In February of 1911, he married again, to Margaret Murray, a cousin, who had been his housekeeper.

Richard Morrissey continued as coachman for the Ames family until about 1914, after which he became a public carriage (hack) driver. By 1920, he operated an automobile garage at 9 East Springfield.

Anna Ames died in March of 1917. The heirs of Oliver Ames continued to own 348 Newbury and the Morrisseys continued to live there until about 1922.

In December of 1922, 348 Newbury was purchased by William H. Wilson and converted into commercial space for the Mason Tire and Rubber Company.

350 Newbury.

350 Newbury (2022)

350 Newbury, a two-story and basement brick garage and dwelling with a 25 foot frontage, was designed by architect R. Clipston Sturgis and built in 1915-1916 by building contractor Daniel L. Shepard.  The October 13, 1915, permit application indicated that the front façade would be of brick and marble. As built, the building had one full story and a basement, and a partial second story. It replaced a two-story plus basement stable and dwelling, one of a pair of matching buildings (348-350 Newbury).

350 Newbury was built for William H. Wellington. who purchased the property in June of 1915 and demolished the original stable building.

William Wellington was a wholesale dry goods merchant and cotton manufacturer. A widower, he lived at 420 Beacon with his son-in-law and daughter, Dr. Simon Burt Wohlbach, a physician, and Anna Florena (Wellington) Wohlbach.

By 1917, William Wellington had leased 350 Newbury to the Maxin Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of automobile carburetors. The company’s president, William Winslow Winchester, a machinist, and his wife, Metha Katherine (Jepsen) Winchester, lived at 350 Newbury until about 1923, when they moved to Topsfield.

350 Newbury (ca 1939), detail from photograph of 338-356 Newbury; courtesy of the Boston City Archives

By 1924, William Wellington and the Wohlbachs were using 350 Newbury as their garage and it became the home of their chauffeur, Frank William Carlson, and his wife, Janet (Patterson) Carlson. They previously had lived in Lowell.

William Wellington died in February of 1925. In his will, he left 420 Beacon and 350 Newbury to Anna Wohlbach.

The Carlsons continued to live at 350 Newbury until about 1934. At about the same time, the Wohlbachs moved from 420 Beacon to South Sudbury.

In 1934, Anna Wohlbach leased 350 Newbury to the DuRay Corporation, dealers in polish. The building was shown as vacant in the 1935-1937 City Directories. By 1938, it was leased to James R. Bennette, a manufacturer’s agent representing the Kooler-Keg beer-droughting system.

Anna Wohlbach continued to own 350 Newbury in the early 1940s. By 1943, it was the property of real estate dealer Ray C. Johnson.

Sometime after 1939, 350 Newbury was remodeled and the second floor expanded, creating a full second story.

350 Newbury (Demolished)

350 Newbury (1912); courtesy of Geoff Stein

350 Newbury was designed by Bradlee and Winslow and built in 1881 by Vinal & Dodge (Warren D. Vinal and Charles A. Dodge), masons, as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 25 foot frontage, one of two built at the same time in the same design (348-350 Newbury). As originally built, each stable had terra cotta animal heads on the eastern portion of the front façade, a cow and dog at 348 Newbury and a horse and a dog ar 350 Newbury, with the two dogs facing so that they appeared to be looking at each other.

350 Newbury was built for merchant and banker Ezra Howes Baker, Jr., who is shown as the owner on the permit application, dated July 19, 1881. He and his wife, Mary Ann (Martyn) Baker, lived at 117 Commonwealth.

Ezra Baker purchased the land for 350 Newbury in January of 1881 from George Wheatland, Jr.  The party walls between 348 and 350 Newbury and between 350 and 352 Newbury were built at a slight angle and were not precisely on the boundary lines.  To correct this deficiency, in May of 1882, Ezra Baker transferred Oliver Ames, the owner of 348 Newbury, a small strip of land with a 0.90 foot frontage on Newbury and a 0.09 foot frontage on the alley, and Walter Hunnewell, the owner of 352 Newbury, transferred Ezra Baker a small strip of land with a 0.36 foot frontage on Newbury and a 0.10 foot frontage on the alley. These transfers resulted in 348 Newbury having a 25 foot frontage on Newbury and the alley, and 350 Newbury having a 25.16 foot frontage on Newbury and a 25.01 foot frontage on the alley.

350 Newbury became the home of the the Bakers’ coachman James H. Porter. He continued to live there until about 1888.

Ezra Baker died in June of 1888.

By 1890, it appears that 350 Newbury had been leased from the Baker family by Eugene Van Rensselaer Thayer.  He and his wife, Susan (Spring) Thayer, lived at 17 Gloucester. They also owned the stable at 334 Newbury.

In 1890, 350 Newbury was the home of the Thayers’ coachman, James Coulter, and his wife, Mary A. (Grant) Coulter, who had lived at 334 Newbury the previous year. By 1891, they had moved back to 334 Newbury and 350 Newbury was the home of the Thayers’ other coachman, Joseph Lake, and his wife, Mary Jane (Bailey) Lake.

In 1893, the Lakes moved to 334 Newbury and the Coulters moved from there back to 350 Newbury. They continued to live there until about 1897.  By 1900, he was coachman for Robert Dawson Evans and his wife, Maria Antoinette (Hunt) Evans, of Beverly, who purchased 17 Gloucester in May of 1901 (17 Gloucester had been built for Eugene and Susan Thayer in 1886-1887 and was their Boston home until 1896, when they moved to 415 Commonwealth).

In June of 1899, 350 Newbury was purchased from the Baker family by George Hamilton Perkins, a Commodore in the US Navy. He and his wife, Anna (Weld) Perkins, lived at 123 Commonwealth. He died died six months later, in October of 1899.

In February of 1900, 350 Newbury was purchased from the Perkins family by Alice (Spaulding) King, the wife of boiler and elevator manufacturer Henry Parsons King. They lived at 205 Commonwealth.

350 Newbury became the home of the Kings’ coachman, George Chapelton Shepherd, and his wife, Elizabeth Henry (Davidson) Shepherd. He previously had been Walter Hunnewell’s coachman and they had lived next door, at 352 Newbury. He died in June of 1909.

By 1910, 350 Newbury was the home of the Kings’ new coachman, John James McMullen, and his wife, Georgina (MacLennan) McMullen. They continued to live there in 1913, but moved thereafter to 347 Newbury when he became the coachman for Herbert Sears of 287 Commonwealth.

George King died in October of 1913 and Alice King sold 350 Newbury in June of 1915 to William H. Wellington, who demolished it and built a new garage in its place.

346-352 Newbury (1912), composite of images courtesy of Geoff Stein

352 Newbury

352 Newbury (2022)

352 Newbury was built in 1881-1882 as a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling on a 25 foot wide lot for banker Walter Hunnewell. He and his wife, Jane (Peele) Hunnewell, built their home at 261 Commonwealth at about the same time. His brother and business partner, Arthur Hunnewell, built the stable at 354 Newbury in 1883, designed in a complementary style.

The permit application for 352 Newbury has not yet been located, but it appears likeliy that it was designed by Shaw and Hunnewell, who are shown on the April 9, 1883, permit application for 354 Newbury.  Shaw and Hunnewell was a partnership of George Russell Shaw and Henry Sargent Hunnewell. Henry Sargent Hunnewell was the brother of Walter and Arthur Hunnewell, and their sister, Isabella Pratt Hunnewell, was married to Robert Gould Shaw, George Shaw’s brother (and former partner in the firm of Shaw and Shaw).

The party wall between 350 and 352 Newbury was built at a slight angle and not precisely on the boundary line, reducing slightly the area of the lot at 350 Newbury. To correct this deficiency, in May of 1882, Walter Hunnewell transferred Ezra Baker, owner of 350 Newbury, a small strip of land with a 0.36 foot frontage on Newbury and a 0.10 foot frontage on the alley, reducing the frontage of 352 Newbury to 24.64 feet on Newbury and 24.90 feet on the alley.

352 Newbury (1912); courtesy of Geoff Stein

By 1883, Walter Hunnewell’s coachman, Daniel McCarty, was living at 352 Newbury. He was among the coachmen mentioned in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.”  He continued to live at 352 Newbury until about 1892.

By 1896, it was the home of coachman George Chapelton Shepherd and his wife, Elizabeth Henry (Davidson) Shepherd. They continued to live there until about 1900, when he became coachman for Henry P. King and they moved next door to 350 Newbury.

For the nexr five years, the Hunnewells’ coachman was Michael B. Kelly, who lived elsewhere.

In August of 1905, Walter Hunnewell sold 352 Newbury to William Albert Paine, co-founder of the investment banking firm of Paine, Webber & Co. That same month, he and his wife, Ruth (Ward) Paine, purchased 409 Commonwealth as their home.

352 Newbury became the home of the Paines’ coachman, Henry Michael Fox, and his wife, Margaret E. (Collins) Fox.

In 1913, William Paine converted 352 Newbury into a garage. Henry Fox became the Paines’ chauffeur, and Henry and Margaret Fox continued to live at 352 Newbury. She died in September of 1926 and he continued to live at 352 Newbury with their children.

William Paine died in September of 1929 and Ruth Paine moved to Swampscott. The Paine family continued to own 352 Newbury and Henry Fox and his children continued to live there.

Boston Herald, 13Apr1941

By the mid-1930s, Henry Fox had moved to Swampscott. 352 Newbury became the home of his son, William Henry Fox, who operated an oil burner service company, and his wife, Lillian G. (Kelley) Fox. They continued to live there until about 1940.

Ruth Paine died in March of 1940. In August of 1940, 352 Newbury was acquired from William Paine’s estate by his daughter-in-law, Frances Joyce (Hatch) Paine, the wife of Francis Ward Paine (who was killed later that month when he fell in front of a train at South Station).  She leased 352 Newbury to the Aetna Window Cleaning Company, and In February of 1947, it acquired the building from her.

354-356 Newbury

354-356 Newbury is a two-story structure built ca. 1918 as part of the City of Boston’s construction of the Boylston subway line. It replaced two stables at 354 Newbury and 356 Newbury, which were taken by the Boston Transit Commission, by eminent domain, and then demolished.

354-356 Newbury (2022)

354 Newbury (Demolished

354 Newbury (1912), courtesy of the Boston City Archives

354 Newbury, a two-story plus basement brick stable and dwelling with a 25 foot frontage, was designed by Shaw and Hunnewell and built in 1883 by William M, Rumery & Co., masons, and David Perkins, carpenter. It was built for banker Arthur Hunnewell, who is shown as the owner on the building permit application, dated April 9, 1883.  His brother and business partner, Walter Hunnewell, built the stable at 352 Newbury in 1881-1882 designed in a complementary style. Shaw and Hunnewell was a partnership of George Russell Shaw and Henry Sargent Hunnewell. Henry Sargent Hunnewell was the brother of Walter and Arthur Hunnewell, and their sister, Isabella Pratt Hunnewell, was married to Robert Gould Shaw, George Shaw’s brother (and former partner in the firm of Shaw and Shaw).

Arthur Hunnewell and his wife, Jane (Boit) Hunnewell, lived at 303 Dartmouth. He purchased the land for 354 Newbury in March of 1883 from George B. Clapp of 165 Commonwealth. George Clapp had purchased the land in April of 1881 from George Wheatland, Jr.

354 Newbury became the home of the Hunnewells’ coachman, Edward Hicks, and his his wife, Rebecca (Rossborough) Hicks. They continued to live there until about 1885.

354 Newbury (1915), courtesy of the Boston City Archives

By 1886, John Duggan had become the Hunnewells’ coachman and lived at 354 Newbury with his wife, Elizabeth (Cronan) Duggan. He was among the coachmen mentioned (with a drawn portrait) in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.” They continued to live at 354 Newbury until about 1890.

In September of 1896, 354 Newbury was purchased from Arthur Hunnewell by chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturer George Robert White of 197 Marlborough.

From 1897 to about 1902, 354 Newbury was the home of George White’s coachman, Malcolm MacNeill (McNeill), and from 1903 to 1907 it was the home of his coachman, George Angus, and his wife, Clara (Matson) Angus.

By about 1909, George White had converted 354 Newbury into a garage and it became the home of his chauffeur, Arthur William Pembroke, and his wife, Kathleen (Walsh) Pembroke. It also was the home of George White’s houseman, John Parks, and his wife, Katherine (Graham) Parks. They continued to live there until about 1914; by 1915, the Pembrokes were living at 12 Aberdeen and the Parkses were living at 10 Aberdeen, both still probably in the employ of George White.

In 1915, George White leased 354 Newbury to the Welsbach Street Lighting Company of America, remodeling the building into a storage facility for street lamps.

The property was taken by the Boston Transit Commission, in December of 1917, and subsequently demolished in conjunction with the the City’s construction of the Boylston subway line.

356 Newbury (Demolished)

356 Newbury (1912), courtesy of the Boston City Archives

356 Newbury was built in 1881 as a two-story brick stable and dwelling with a 27 foot frontage for textile and iron manufacturer John Appleton Burnham, who had purchased the land in June of 1881 from George Wheatland, Jr.

John Burnham and his wife, Jane (Denison) Burnham, lived at 21 Commonwealth.

356 Newbury became the home of the Burnhams’ coachman, Michel Alfred Yates, and his wife, Cecile Augustine (Sourdeau) Yates.

John Burnham died in August of 1883. Alfred Yates continued as Jane Burnham’s coachman and was among the coachmen mentioned in a February 17, 1889, Boston Herald feature article on the “Men Who Drive for Boston’s First Families.” Cecile Yates died in September of 1895 and Alfred Yates married again in November of 1897 to Sarah Barrett.

Jane Burnham died in March of 1899. Alfred and Sarah Yates moved from 356 Newbury soon thereafter. By 1901, he had become coachman for the Daggett family and he and his wife lived at 337 Newbury.

356 Newbury (1915), courtesy of the Boston City Archives

In January of 1901, 356 Newbury was purchased from John Burnham’s estate by real estate trustee Ralph Blake Williams of 304 Commonwealth.

By 1902, 356 Newbury was the home of Ralph Williams’s coachman, John O’Brien, and his wife, Ellen (Kelley) O’Brien. They previously had lived at 16 St. Germain (which they had purchased in April of 1898) and, before that, at 339 Newbury when he was coachman to John F. Andrew of 32 Hereford. They continued to live at 356 Newbury until about 1909, and then moved back to 16 St. Germain.

In June of 1909, Ralph Williams sold 356 Newbury to Elizabeth (Andrew) Mason, wife of paper manufacturer Charles Ellis Mason. They lived at 25 Exeter. Soon after purchasing the property, they appear to have converted it from a stable into a garage.

By 1910, 356 Newbury was the home of Simon Peter Kelly, the Masons’ coachman and then chauffeur, and his wife, Hanora Mary (Nagle) Kelly. They moved soon thereafter.

By 1911, the Masons’ chauffeur, Robert Curran, and his wife, Mary A. (Coveney) Curran, were living at 356 Newbury. They continued to live there until about 1913.

In November of 1915, Elizabeth Mason sold 356 Newbury to Sarah J. (MacCann) MacCormack, wife of John George MacCormack. They leased the property to their son, John George MacCormack, Jr., an automobile tire dealer.

356 Newbury changed hands and in December of 1917 was taken by the Boston Transit Commission and subsequently demolished in conjunction with the the City’s construction of the Boylston subway line.

338-356 Newbury (ca 1939), courtesy of the Boston City Archives

 360-362 Newbury / 102-118 Massachusetts Avenue

360 Newbury (2022)

360-362 Newbury / 102-118 Massachusetts Avenue was designed by Arthur H. Bowditch and built in 1917-1918 by the George W. Harvey Co., contractors, as a seven-story building to be used for stores, offices, and lofts. It was built for the Newbury Realty Company (Albert Geiger, Jr., president), which acquired the property in March of 1917 from the Boston Transit Commission. In the deed, the City reserved ownership of specified structures and easements connected with the subway and leased from the City by the Boston Elevated Railway, which operated the subway system.  The building replaced the Boston Cab Company stables, demolished ca. 1913 in conjuntion with construction of the subway.

When it was completed, it was known as the Transit Building. The Newbury Realty Company leased the street level space to the Back Bay National Bank and most of the office and loft space to the Boston Elevated Railway Company.

In 1989, the building was significantly remodeled, with the remodeling designed by architects Frank Gehry of Los Angeles and Schwartz/Silver of Boston.

In September of 2006, the offices were converted into 54 residential condominiums on floors four through eight, with retail on the first three floors.

360 Newbury (1921);American Architect, 23Feb1921

360-362 Newbury / 102-118 Massachusetts Avenue (Demolished)

360-362 Newbury / 102-118 Massachusetts Avenue was built in 1882 as a four-story (three stories and a mansard roof), 100-horse brick commercial stable on the southeast corner of Newbury and Massachusetts Avenue, with a frontage of 118.5 feet on Newbury and 100 feet on Massachusetts Avenue. It was built for real estate dealer George Wheatland, Jr. The permit application, dated May 8, 1882, indicates that it was built by Laming & Drisko (John S. Laming and Alonzo S. Drisko), carpenters, and Vinal & Dodge (Warren D. Vinal and Charles A. Dodge), masons. No architect is identified.

In June of 1883, George Wheatland, Jr., sold the property to Warren D. Vinal, and in May of 1884, he sold it to the Boston Cab Company, which maintained its stables and carriage storage in the building.

In April of 1894, the Boston Cab Company was reorganized as the Charles S. Brown Company and 360 Newbury was transferred into its name. It continued to operate at 360 Newbury under the name Boston Cab Company.  In 1909, the Taxi-Service Company, which operated automobile cabs, purchased an interest in the company and subsequently maintained its garage at the Boston Cab Company’s stables.  In 1911, the Boston Cab Company ceased to operate and auctioned off its stables and carriages. 360 Newbury was purchased in August of 1911 from the Charles S. Brown Company by Richards M. Bradley as trustee of the Massachusetts Avenue Associates Trust,

The Taxi Motor Cab Company continued to operate at 360 Neabury along with other automotive-related businesses.

In September of 1912 and April of 1913, portions of the lot at 360 Newbury were taken by the Boston Transit Commission, by eminent doman, in conjunction with construction of the Boylston Street subway and Massachusetts Avenue station. As originally planned, the subway tunnel was to be built under the existing building. However, the contractor determined that doing so would be unsafe and could cause a collapse of the building.

In September of 1913, Richards Bradley conveyed the remaining property, including the building, to the City of Boston, which subsequently razed it to facilitate construction of the subway and station.

In March of 1917, the City conveyed the property to the Newbury Realty Company which subsequently built a seven-story building on the property.