Samuel Dudley Kelley

Personal Data

Samuel Dudley Kelley was born on July 16, 1848, in Yarmouth; the son of David Kelley and his wife, Phebe Wing Dudley (daughter of Samuel Dudley).

He married on April 12, 1870, in Yarmouth, to Sarah E. Matthews (b. 1848-1850 in Abington; d. 14Jul1888 in Somerville), daughter of Nathaniel Matthews and his wife, Hannah (LNU).

Samuel Kelley died on May 9, 1938, in South Yarmouth.  According to his obituary in the New York Times, he was the last of the founders of the Quaker colony in South Yarmouth.

Career

Samuel Kelley was educated at the Friends School in Providence.  After apprenticing in Boston, he became one of the most prolific architects of homes in the Back Bay.  In his Houses of Boston’s Back Bay, Bainbridge Bunting lists over 150 houses designed by Kelley, starting in 1878, one third of which were in the Bay State Road area.  He frequently worked in tandem with speculative builders, including William Rand, George Wheatland, and Chadwick and Stillings.

His work, while prolific, was not as distinguished as that of some other architects who worked in the district.  Bunting refers only once to buildings by Kelley: 461-471 Commonwealth, which he states “bear witness to the degradation which overtook Richardson’s personal idiom in most parts of America and, even, on occasion, in Boston, when speculative builders exploited the style…these houses lack unity as a group or as single units and their individual elements compete for the spectator’s interest.”

Kelley also was a leading architect of apartment houses.  He designed The Royal (1885) at 295 Beacon Street, the first apartment house in the Back Bay, and is credited by Bunting as architect for nine others.  He also built multiple dwellings in the suburbs.  Douglass Shand-Tucci (Built in Boston) comments that the same architects often designed both urban masonry apartments and suburban wooden multiple dwellings, noting “Samuel Kelley’s wooden decker at 20-24 Meacham Road (1894) in Cambridge is identical in design concept to his brick four-flat building (1889) at 423 Marlborough Street in the Back Bay.”

Back Bay Work

1878 249 Commonwealth
1878 248 Commonwealth (Demolished)
1878 250 Commonwealth (Demolished)
1879 114 Commonwealth
1879 252 Commonwealth
1879 258 Commonwealth
1879 260 Commonwealth
1879 314 Marlborough
1879 320 Marlborough
1880 262 Commonwealth
1880 286 Commonwealth
1880 288 Commonwealth
1880 294 Commonwealth
1880 296 Commonwealth
1880 298 Commonwealth
1880 180 Marlborough
1880 182 Marlborough
1880 230 Marlborough
1880 232 Marlborough
1880 234 Marlborough
1881 333 Beacon
1881 335 Beacon
1881 337 Beacon
1881 339 Beacon
1881 341 Beacon
1881 318 Commonwealth
1881 320 Commonwealth
1881 236 Marlborough
1881 238 Marlborough
1881 240 Marlborough
1881 242 Marlborough
1882 128 Commonwealth
1882 130 Commonwealth
1882 264 Commonwealth
1882 29 Gloucester
1882 31 Gloucester
1882 33 Gloucester
1882 35 Gloucester (279 Newbury)
1882 193 Marlborough
1882 241 Marlborough
1882 244 Marlborough
1883 266 Commonwealth
1883 180 Commonwealth (Demolished)
1883 246 Marlborough
1885 295 Beacon
1885 453 Beacon
1885 274 Commonwealth
1885 276 Commonwealth
1885 252 Marlborough
1885 390 Marlborough
1885 392 Marlborough
1886 394 Marlborough
1887 511 Beacon
1887 513 Beacon
1887 515 Beacon
1887 517 Beacon
1887 519 Beacon
1887 521 Beacon
1887 523 Beacon
1887 525 Beacon
1887 527 Beacon
1887 529 Beacon
1888 499 Beacon
1888 531 Beacon
1888 204 Commonwealth
1888 393 Marlborough
1888 395 Marlborough
1888 397 Marlborough
1889 308 Commonwealth
1889 405 Marlborough
1889 407 Marlborough
1889 421 Marlborough
1889 423 Marlborough
1889 424 Marlborough
1889 47 Massachusetts
1889 49 Massachusetts
1890 293 Commonwealth
1890 295 Commonwealth
1890 409 Marlborough
1890 411 Marlborough
1891 31 Massachusetts